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Reimbursement guide for myocardial perfusion imaging

Reimbursement Guide - Cardiology
Guide for Myocardial Perfusion Imaging
including radiopharmaceuticals
and related product information

2015 Reimbursement Guide
for Myocardial Perfusion Imaging including
radiopharmaceuticals and related product information

Cardinal Health is the only national network that provides the full range of patient-specific, unit dose, cardiac imaging agents for nuclear medicine which includes: • Myoview™ Kit for the Preparation of Technetium Tc99m Tetrofosmin for Injection • Cardiolite® Kit for the Preparation of Technetium Tc99m Sestamibi for Injection • Tc99m sestamibi (generic) • Thallous chloride Tl201 • All commercial y available pharmaceutical stress agents More for you … we dispense a wide variety of brands to supply exactly what your nuclear medicine practice needs. Cardinal Health reflects the highest standards in compounding, delivery, safety, consulting, information technology and business support services. CPT/HCPCS Codes and Medicare Payment for 2015
Radiopharmaceuticals
Medicare Hospital Outpatient Prospective Physician Fee Schedule Technetium Tc99m Assigned status of "N" Invoice or AWP based2 sestamibi, diagnostic, payment packaged into Technetium Tc99m Assigned status of "N" Invoice or AWP based2 tetrofosmin, diagnostic, payment packaged into Thallium Tl-201 thallous Assigned status of "N" Invoice or AWP based2 chloride, diagnostic, per payment packaged into 1 HCPCS code A9500 is used to bill for either Tc99m Cardiolite® or Tc99m sestamibi (generic), as the descriptor is not brand specific.
2 Medicare Part B contractors determine radiopharmaceutical payment al owance limits based on the methodology in place as of November 2003 which al ows invoice or Average Wholesale Price (AWP) based reimbursement. For more specific information and bil ing guidance, contact your local Medicare Part B contractor directly.
Pharmacologic stress agents
Injection adenosine, Assigned status of "N" payment packaged intoAPC rate Injection, dipyridamole, Assigned status of "N" payment packaged into APC rate Injection, dobutamine Assigned status of "N" payment packaged into APC rate Injection, regadenoson, Assigned status of "N" per 0.1 mil igram payment packaged intoAPC rate 3 Listed reimbursement reflects the Medicare 2015 ASP Drug Pricing Files. These rates may change on a quarterly basis. For current information, contact the manufacturer.
Myocardial perfusion imaging (national average payment) for 2015 Professional Technical
78451 Myocardial perfusion imaging,
tomographic (SPECT) (including attenuation correction, qualitative or quantitative wall motion, ejection fraction by first pass or gated technique, additional quantification, when performed); single study, at rest or stress (exercise or pharmacologic) 78452 Myocardial perfusion imaging,
tomographic (SPECT) (including attenuation correction, qualitative or quantitative wall motion, ejection fraction by first pass or gated technique, additional quantification, when performed); multiple studies, at rest and/or stress (exercise or pharmacologic) and/or redistribution and/or rest reinjection 78453 Myocardial perfusion imaging, planar
(including attenuation correction, qualitative or quantitative wall motion, ejection fraction by first pass or gated technique, additional quantification, when performed); single study, at rest or stress (exercise or pharmacologic) 78454 Myocardial perfusion imaging, planar
(including attenuation correction, qualitative or quantitative wall motion, ejection fraction by first pass or gated technique, additional quantification, when performed); multiple studies, at rest and/or stress (exercise or pharmacologic) and/or redistribution and/or rest reinjection Myocardial perfusion imaging (national average payment) Cardiovascular stress test using maximal or submaximal treadmil or bicycle exercise, continuous electrocardiographic monitoring, and/or pharmacological stress; with physician supervision, with interpretation and report Cardiovascular stress test using maximal or submaximal treadmil or bicycle exercise, continuous electrocardiographic monitoring, and/or pharmacological stress; physician supervision only, without interpretation and report Cardiovascular stress test using maximal or submaximal treadmil or bicycle exercise, continuous electrocardiographic monitoring, and/or pharmacological stress; tracing only, without interpretation and report same date of service as other service Cardiovascular stress test using maximal or submaximal treadmil or bicycle exercise, continuous electrocardiographic monitoring, and/or pharmacological stress; interpretation and report only 1 Code includes physician professional services that are not paid under HOPPS.
Myocardial perfusion imaging (national average payment) Suggested Medicare Hospital Revenue Codes: Nuclear medicine diagnostic procedures Cardiovascular stress test using maximal or submaximal treadmil or bicycle exercise, continuous electrocardiographic monitoring, Stress pharmaceuticals and/or pharmacological stress; with physician supervision, with interpretation and report Additional sources of reimbursement information:
Cardiovascular stress test using maximal or submaximal treadmil or bicycle exercise, • CMS-1613-FC; Hospital Outpatient Prospective Payment - Final Rule with Comment continuous electrocardiographic monitoring, Period and CY2015 Payment Rates and/or pharmacological stress; physician supervision only, without interpretation Cardiovascular stress test using maximal or submaximal treadmil or bicycle exercise, continuous electrocardiographic monitoring, • CMS-1612-FC; Medicare Physician Fee Schedule Final Rule with comment period CY2015 and/or pharmacological stress; tracing only, without interpretation and report service as other service • The Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging procedure and Cardiovascular stress test using maximal or radiopharmaceutical coding tables with Medicare payment rates: submaximal treadmil or bicycle exercise, continuous electrocardiographic monitoring, – Tables for hospital outpatient setting and/or pharmacological stress; interpretation 1 Code includes physician professional services that are not paid under HOPPS.
– Tables for physician office/clinic setting: • Medicare 2015 ASP Drug Pricing Files: • National Drug Code (NDC) Directory: Manufacturer reimbursement websites:
• Lantheus Medical Imaging, Inc.: • GE Healthcare: • Astel as Pharma US, Inc.: Reimbursement information is provided by Cardinal Health as general coding and payment information. This information is not intended to replace or serve as a substitute for your duty to verify that such information is proper for your particular circumstances. Any codes reported should accurately reflect the procedures performed and the patient's conditions. You may want to consult with local payers to confirm compliance with local policies, or otherwise review and confirm reimbursement policies with your own legal or professional advisors. Regulations may change from time to time. Cardinal Health has no obligation to inform the customer of any such changes. Payments listed in this guide are based on CMS payments effective January 1, 2015. Cardinal Health is committed to supporting our customers' needs and is proud to provide ongoing solutions that promote safe and responsible practices in the field of nuclear medicine.
Important safety information
Cardiolite® (Kit for the Preparation of Technetium Tc99m Sestamibi for Injection) and
Tc99m sestamibi (generic)
CARDIOLITE® has been rarely associated with acute severe allergic and anaphylactic events of angioedema and generalized urticaria. In some patients the al ergic symptoms developed on the second injection during CARDIOLITE® imaging. The most frequently reported adverse events include headache, chest pain/angina, ST segment changes on ECG, nausea, and abnormal taste and smel . Infrequently, death has occurred 4 to 24 hours after Tc99m Sestamibi use and is usual y associated with exercise stress testing (See Section 5.2). Pharmacologic induction of cardiovascular stress may be associated with serious adverse events such as myocardial infarction, arrhythmia, hypotension, bronchoconstriction and Source: Myoview™ (Kit for the Preparation of Technetium Tc99m Tetrofosmin for Injection)
In studying patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease, care should be taken to ensure continuous cardiac monitoring and the availability of emergency cardiac treatment. As with all injectable drug products, al ergic reactions, and anaphylaxis may occur. Pharmacologic induction of cardiovascular stress may be associated with serious adverse events, such as myocardial infarction, arrhythmia, hypotension, bronchoconstriction, and cerebrovascular events. Caution should be used when pharmacologic stress is selected as an alternative to exercise; it should be used when indicated and in accordance with the pharmacologic stress agent's labeling. The most common adverse reactions reported from post- marketing experience included rash, urticaria, abnormal vision, al ergic reactions, and fever. Thallous Chloride Tl201 Injection
Do not administer Lexiscan to patients with second- or third-degree AV block or sinus node dysfunction unless these patients have a functioning artificial pacemaker. Fatal cardiac arrest, life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias, and myocardial infarction may result from the ischemia induced by pharmacologic stress agents. Hypersensitivity including anaphylaxis, angioedema, cardiac or respiratory arrest, respiratory distress, decreased oxygen saturation, hypotension, throat tightness, urticaria and rashes have occurred. Resuscitation equipment and trained staff should be immediately available before administering Lexiscan. Adenosine receptor agonists, including Lexiscan, can depress the SA and AV nodes and may cause first-, second-, or third-degree AV block, or sinus bradycardia requiring intervention. In postmarketing experience, heart block (including third degree), and asystole within minutes of Lexiscan administration have occurred. Adenosine receptor agonists, including Lexiscan, induce arterial vasodilation and hypotension. The risk of serious hypotension may be higher in patients with autonomic dysfunction, hypovolemia, left main coronary artery stenosis, stenotic valvular heart disease, pericarditis or pericardial effusions, or stenotic carotid artery disease with cerebrovascular insufficiency. In postmarketing experience, transient ischemic attack, seizures and syncope have been observed. Adenosine receptor agonists, including Lexiscan, may result in clinical y significant increases in blood pressure in some patients. In postmarketing experience, cases of potential y clinical y significant hypertension have been reported, particularly in patients with underlying hypertension and when low-level exercise was included in the MPI. Adenosine receptor agonists, including Lexiscan, may cause dyspnea, bronchoconstriction and respiratory compromise. Appropriate bronchodilator therapy and resuscitative measures should be available prior to Lexiscan administration. The most common adverse reactions (≥5%) to Lexiscan are dyspnea, headache, flushing, chest discomfort, angina pectoris or ST-segment depression, dizziness, chest pain, nausea, abdominal discomfort, dysgeusia, and feeling hot. Most adverse reactions began soon after dosing, and general y resolved within approximately 15 minutes, except for headache, which resolved in most patients within 30 minutes. Aminophyl ine was used as a reversal agent in 3% of patients. In postmarketing experience, QTc prolongation, tremor, abdominal pain in association with nausea, vomiting, or myalgias, and diarrhea, fecal incontinence, wheezing and musculoskeletal pain have occurred.
Lexiscan® (regadenoson injection)
Do not administer Lexiscan to patients with second- or third-degree AV block or sinus node dysfunction unless these patients have a functioning artificial pacemaker. Fatal cardiac arrest, life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias, and myocardial infarction may result from the ischemia induced by pharmacologic stress agents. Hypersensitivity including anaphylaxis, angioedema, cardiac or respiratory arrest, respiratory distress, decreased oxygen saturation, hypotension, throat tightness, urticaria and rashes have occurred. Resuscitation equipment and trained staff should be immediately available before administering Lexiscan. Adenosine receptor agonists, including Lexiscan, can depress the SA and AV nodes and may cause first-, second-, or third-degree AV block, or sinus bradycardia requiring intervention. In postmarketing experience, heart block (including third degree), and asystole within minutes of Lexiscan administration have occurred. Adenosine receptor agonists, including Lexiscan, induce arterial vasodilation and hypotension. The risk of serious hypotension may be higher in patients with autonomic dysfunction, hypovolemia, left main coronary artery stenosis, stenotic valvular heart disease, pericarditis or pericardial effusions, or stenotic carotid artery disease with cerebrovascular insufficiency. In postmarketing experience, transient ischemic attack, seizures and syncope have been observed. Adenosine receptor agonists, including Lexiscan, may result in clinical y significant increases in blood pressure in some patients. In postmarketing experience, cases of potential y clinical y significant hypertension have been reported, particularly in patients with underlying hypertension and when low-level exercise was included in the MPI. Adenosine receptor agonists, including Lexiscan, may cause dyspnea, bronchoconstriction and respiratory compromise. Appropriate bronchodilator therapy and resuscitative measures should be available prior to Lexiscan administration. The most common adverse reactions (≥5%) to Lexiscan are dyspnea, headache, flushing, chest discomfort, angina pectoris or ST-segment depression, dizziness, chest pain, nausea, abdominal discomfort, dysgeusia, and feeling hot. Most adverse reactions began soon after dosing, and general y resolved within approximately 15 minutes, except for headache, which resolved in most patients within 30 minutes. Aminophyl ine was used as a reversal agent in 3% of patients. In postmarketing experience, QTc prolongation, tremor, abdominal pain in association with nausea, vomiting, or myalgias, and diarrhea, fecal incontinence, wheezing and musculoskeletal pain have occurred. Source: Important safety information
Adenoscan® (adenosine injection)
Adenoscan is contraindicated in patients with second- or third-degree AV block, unless these patients have a functioning artificial pacemaker, sinus node disease, and known or suspected bronchoconstrictive or bronchospastic lung disease. Fatal cardiac arrest, sustained ventricular tachycardia (requiring resuscitation), and nonfatal myocardial infarction have been reported coincident with Adenoscan infusion. Patients with unstable angina may be at greater risk. Appropriate resuscitative measures should be available. Adenoscan is a potent peripheral vasodilator and can cause significant hypotension. The risk of hypotension may be higher in patients with cardiac or cerebrovascular insufficiency. Adenoscan exerts a direct depressant effect on the SA and AV nodes and has the potential to cause first-, second- or third-degree AV block, or sinus bradycardia. Increases in systolic and diastolic pressure have been observed. Adenosine receptor agonists, including Adenoscan, may cause bronchoconstriction and respiratory compromise. Atrial fibril ation has been reported in patients with Adenoscan infusion and may last from a few seconds to hours, however, patients spontaneously converted to normal sinus rhythm. Most common adverse reactions (≥5%) to Adenoscan are flushing, chest discomfort, dyspnea, headache, discomfort of the throat, neck, or jaw, gastrointestinal discomfort, and lightheadedness/dizziness. Side effects with Adenoscan usual y resolve quickly when the infusion is discontinued, although delayed or persistent effects have been observed.
Serious adverse reactions associated with the administration of intravenous dipyridamole have included cardiac death, fatal and non-fatal myocardial infarction, ventricular fibril ation, symptomatic ventricular tachycardia, stroke, transient cerebral ischemia, seizures, anaphylactoid reaction, and bronchospasm. There have been reported cases of asystole, sinus node arrest, sinus node depression and conduction block. Patients with abnormalities of cardiac impulse formation/conduction or severe coronary artery disease may be at increased risk for these events. In a study of 3911 patients given intravenous dipyridamole as an adjunct to thallium myocardial perfusion imaging, two types of serious adverse events were reported: 1) four cases of myocardial infarction (0.1%), two fatal (0.05%) and two non-fatal (0.05%); and 2) six cases of severe bronchospasm (0.2%). Although the incidence of these serious adverse events was small (0.3%, 10 of 3911), the potential clinical information to be gained through use of intravenous dipyridamole thal ium imaging (see INDICATION AND USAGE noting the rate of false positive and false negative results) must be weighed against the risk to the patient. Patients with a history of unstable angina may be at a greater risk for severe myocardial ischemia. Patients with a history of asthma may be at a greater risk for bronchospasm during dipyridamole injection use. hen thal ium myocardial perfusion imaging is performed with intravenous dipyridamole, parenteral aminophyl ine should be readily available for relieving adverse events such as bronchospasm or chest pain. Vital signs should be monitored during, and for 10–15 minutes fol owing, the intravenous infusion of dipyridamole and an electrocardiographic tracing should be obtained using at least one chest lead. Should severe chest pain or bronchospasm occur, parenteral aminophyl ine may be administered by slow intravenous injection (50–100 mg over 30–60 seconds) in doses ranging from 50 to 250 mg. In the case of severe hypotension, the patient should be placed in a supine position with the head tilted down if necessary, before administration of parenteral aminophyl ine. If 250 mg of aminophyl ine does not relieve chest pain symptoms within a few minutes, sublingual nitroglycerin may be administered. If chest pain continues despite use of aminophyl ine and nitroglycerin, the possibility of myocardial infarction should be considered. If the clinical condition of a patient with an adverse event permits a one minute delay in the administration of parenteral aminophyl ine, thal ium-201 may be injected and al owed to circulate for one minute before the injection of aminophyl ine. This will al ow initial thal ium perfusion imaging to be performed before reversal of the pharmacologic effects of dipyridamole injection on the coronary circulation.
Source: Dobutamine Injection USP:
Increase in heart rate or blood pressure – Dobutamine may cause a marked increase in heart rate or blood pressure, especial y systolic pressure. Approximately 10% of adult patients in clinical studies have had rate increases of 30 beats/minute or more, and about 7.5% have had a 50 mm Hg or greater increase in systolic pressure. Usual y, reduction of dosage promptly reverses these effects. Because dobutamine facilitates atrioventricular conduction, patients with atrial fibril ation are at risk of developing rapid ventricular response. In patients who have atrial fibril ation with rapid ventricular response, a digitalis preparation should be used prior to institution of therapy with dobutamine. Patients with pre-existing hypertension appear to face an increased risk of developing an exaggerate pressor response. Ectopic activity – Dobutamine may precipitate or exacerbate ventricular ectopic activity, but rarely has caused ventricular tachycardia. Hypersensitivity – Reactions suggestive of hypersensitivity associated with administration of dobutamine including skin rash, fever, eosinophilia, and bronchospasm, have been reported occasional y. Dobutamine contains sodium bisulfite, a sulfite that may cause al ergic-type reactions, including anaphylactic symptoms and life-threatening or less severe asthmatic episodes, in certain susceptible people. The overall prevalence of sulfite sensitivity in the general population is unknown and probably low. Sulfite sensitivity is seen more frequently in asthmatic than in nonasthmatic people.
For complete package insert information for any of the listed products, go to: Reimbursement Guide - Cardiology
Cardiolite® is a registered trademark of Lantheus Medical Imaging, Inc.
Myoview™ is a trademark of GE Healthcare, Ltd.
Adenoscan® and Lexiscan® are registered trademarks of Astellas US LLCCPT only 2014 American Medical Association. All rights reserved.
2015 Cardinal Health. All rights reserved. CARDINAL HEALTH, the Cardinal Health LOGO and ESSENTIAL TO CARE are trademarks 7000 Cardinal Place or registered trademarks of Cardinal Health. All other marks are the property of their respective owners. Lit. No. 1NPS15-27602 (01/2015) Dublin, Ohio 43017

Source: http://www.cardinalhealth.com/content/dam/corp/web/documents/catalog/CardinalHealth-Cardiology-Reimbursement-Guide.pdf

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Drug-Induced Encephalopathy Julius-Maximilians University Würzburg, Department of Neurology 1. Introduction Drug-induced encephalopathy is a disease entity often caused by impaired cerebral metabolism that is not attributed to structural brain lesions. However, some drug-induced encephalopathies can develop structural lesions and share other underlying pathophysiological mechanisms (table 2). Leading symptoms are acute or chronic disturbances of consciousness, brain function and personality changes with concomitant neurological symptoms such as asterixis, myoclonias, paresis or seizures (see table 3). Isoniazid-induced encephalopathy was one of the earliest descriptions of a drug-induced encephalopathy (Adams & White, 1965). Clinical symptoms depend on the type and severity of the drug-evoked encephalopathy. A well-described and frequently-reported drug-induced encephalopathy is valproic acid encephalopathy, first described in the late 1970s. This acute encephalopathy was characterized by altered behaviour, worsening seizure control and confusion. After a reduction in the valproate acid dose, the patient's symptoms resolved completely (Chadwick et al., 1979). Encephalopathies have been reported after consumption of several types of drugs as depicted below (table 1).

Microsoft word - roi mars 2015.docx

Siège et Secrétariat : 14/4, rue des Croisiers ' 081228723 - 081230292 : info@ffbjudo.be article 76 des statuts " Un règlement d'ordre intérieur régit les relations des clubs-membres et des affiliés avec l'association ou entre eux; il est élaboré par le Conseil d'Administration et soumis à l'approbation de l'assemblée