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TERMS OF REFERENCE 1
Assignment Title:
Hiring Services of a Survey Firm to Conduct One Round of School & Household Surveys
Impact Evaluation of Phase II of the Supplemental Stipends Pilot Program in Punjab
Duration: April 1, 2015 – June 30, 2015
1. INTRODUCTION

Under the Second Punjab Education Sector Reform Program (PESRP II), supported by international
Development Partners (DPs), the Government of Punjab (GOP) is seeking an experienced survey research
firm in Pakistan to conduct household and school surveys for a rigorous impact evaluation of Phase II of the
Supplemental Stipends Pilot in Punjab (SSPP-II). The impact evaluation of SSPP-II was launched in April
2014 and employs a prospective experimental design, where selected middle and secondary government
schools serving girls in tehsils with low school participation rates in existing stipend districts were randomly
assigned to two treatment groups corresponding to different supplemental benefit levels, and one control
group.
The survey research firm is required to conduct extensive school and household sample surveys in identified
communities served by SSPP-II. The firm is expected to undertake all activities related to survey data
collection, entry, processing and quality-control.
1. BACKGROUND

Beginning in 2003, the Government of Punjab has been implementing a multifaceted sector reform program
– the Punjab Education Sector Reform Program (PESRP) which focuses on improving service delivery
1 Updated on June 11, 2014 to reflect revised deliverable dates and work timeline. Updated on June 25, 2014 to reflect revised deliverable dates and scope of work. Updated on December 30, 2014 to reflect modifications for the second survey round. performance to realize meaningful and continuing gains in educational outcomes. Since 2004, the distribution of stipends to female students has been a key activity of PESRP as a means to incentivize girls‟ enrollment and retention in middle and secondary levels of education. This program is targeted to girls enrolled in grades 6-10 in government schools in 16 low literacy districts of Punjab. Under the original program, Rs. 600 is provided on a quarterly basis to girls who maintained an attendance rate of at least 80%. In 2013-14, on average, 410,000 beneficiaries received stipends in each quarter. Going forward, the Government of Punjab seeks to modify the design of the benefit structure to strengthen the incentive effect of the program, and sharpen the focus on gains in transition and retention outcomes of disadvantaged girls. Phase II of the Supplemental Stipends Pilot Program (SSPP-II) is a three-year pilot launched in April 2014 in low participation tehsils of 6 districts.2 In these tehsils, girls in grades 6-10 in select rural government schools are offered a supplemental benefit amount, over and above the Rs. 2,400 per year that they received before. SSPP-II also tests at least one additional new design feature, i.e. an additional stipend on progression to grades 9 and 10.3 4 SSPP-II is being rigorously evaluated to determine the causal effects of the program on key outcomes such as school participation and progression, as well as spillover effects on intra-household behavior. The impact evaluation of SSPP-II employs a prospective experimental design, whereby 659 rural middle and secondary government schools for girls from the 6 districts are either part of one of the two treatment groups (corresponding to different supplemental benefit levels) or no treatment (i.e. control group).5 2 These are the following 18 tehsils from six districts with below average school participation rates of girls ages 11-15 in rural areas: DG Khan, KotChuta and Taunsa in DG Khan; Chaubara, KarorLalisan and Layyah in Layyah; DunyaPur, KarorPacca and Lodhran in Lodhran; Alipur, Jatoi and Muzaffargarh in Muzaffargarh; Khanpur, Rahimyar Khan and Sadiqabad in Rahimyar Khan; and Jampur, Rajanpur and Rojhan in Rajanpur. The region of KotChuta in DG Khan will be treated as a tehsil for the purpose of this impact evaluation. 3 Specifically, the following financial incentive packages (or "treatments") are being piloted: Girls in grades 6-8 receive Rs. 900 per quarter based on 80% attendance. Girls in grades 9-10 receive Rs. 1200 per quarter based on 80% attendance. Girls in grades 6-8 receive Rs. 900 per quarter based on 80% attendance. Girls in grade 9-10 receive Rs. 2400 upon progression to this grade in the first quarter of the school year + Rs. 1200 per quarter based on 80% attendance. Girls in grades 6-10 receive Rs. 600 per quarter based on 80% attendance. This is the same benefit structure as in the original stipends 4 Half of the control group clusters could potentially be offered a different treatment later. 5 To clarify, randomization was done at the "school cluster" level, which means that whole clusters were assigned to either treatment or control (i.e. if a cluster is assigned to treatment, all schools in that cluster are being treated). In this context, a "school cluster" is
The original design note for the impact evaluation is included as Appendix A.
2. SCOPE OF WORK

The survey will cover 659 SSPP-II treatment and control schools in the 6 districts for which valid GPS
coordinates were collected and that could be assigned to treatment and control groups as well as a sample of
households in 431 settlements in 372 selected mouzas. The list of schools, mouzas and settlements are
included as Appendix B and Appendix C. Their GPS coordinates and additional information will be provided
to the survey firm by the Program Monitoring and Implementation Unit (PMIU) and the World Bank (WB). In a sample of mouzas served by the 659 schools, the firm will administer one round of follow-up household survey in around 3,830 „eligible‟ households identified in the baseline survey. An „eligible‟ household is defined as a household that had at least one female child aged 10 to 16 at the time of the baseline survey.6, 7 The household surveys will comprise of interviews with parents and children (sample), as well as cognitive and/or learning assessments of children at home (sample). In addition, the firm will be required to record locational data (GPS) on domiciles visited. The time period for the baseline household survey was June-August 2015. The time period for the first follow-up household survey is April-June 2015. The survey research firm will also conduct school based follow-up surveys in 659 SSPP-II treatment and control schools in the 6 districts. School surveys will comprise of school observations, head-teacher, teacher and student interviews (sample)8, recording of location (school GPS), and extraction/capture of information defined as a girls‟ secondary school and all feeder schools for girls offering grades 6-8 and which are designated "rural" in the annual 6 Given the large number of mouzas, it was not feasible to do household surveys in all affected mouzas. For this reason, a multi-stage stratified random sample design was adopted. In the first stage, a sample of PSUs (mouzas) was selected from each "school cluster" (treatment or control). Inside these mouzas, a sample of SSUs (settlements) was randomly selected with a fixed schedule. Finally, inside settlements the baseline survey was administered in only a sample of „eligible‟ households (3rd stage – selection of TSUs). These households were selected with the help of the random-walk algorithm described in Appendix D. In each sampled household, the mother or household head will be interviewed as well as a sample of school-aged children (in the follow-up survey one child will selected within the age range of 6 to 10, and one selected within the age range of 18 to 25; all children aged 11 to 17 will be interviewed; if there are 3 or fewer children in the household between the ages of 6 to 25, all children will be interviewed). 7 The households interviewed in the first follow-up round will be the same households that were interviewed in the baseline round - i.e. the household surveys are envisaged as panel household surveys. It is imperative that an overwhelming proportion of households interviewed in the baseline survey will be re-interviewed in the follow-up survey. Appendix E sets out a procedure meant to assure this will indeed be the case; the list of panel households will be provided to the survey firm by the PMIU and the World Bank. 8 If the school offers only up to grade 8, then only one classroom will be sampled, from grades 6-8. If the school offers up to grade 10, then two classes will be sampled – one from grades 6-8 and one from grades 9-10. In each sampled classroom, up to 10 students and 2 teachers who teach that classroom will be selected for the interview. Head-teachers will also be interviewed. from registers and records at school. The time period for the baseline school survey was May-June 2014. The time period for the first follow-up school survey is April-May 2015. The survey firm is expected to undertake all activities related to survey and test piloting, field mobilization, and data collection, entry, and processing. The firm must also have procedures and strictly follow them to identify and track households over the survey rounds. Data quality is the top priority, and the PMIU and the World Bank will provide direct, close supervision to this end. Based on a performance review after completing the first follow-up household and school surveys, the contract with the firm may be extended / modified to include additional rounds of follow-up surveys.

3. KEY TASKS AND RESPONSIBILITIES

The key tasks and responsibilities of the firm are described in Table 1.
Deliverable
(Revised)9
A. Field mobilization C1. Provide feedback, as requested, on all survey instruments and tests, particularly Complete with respect to question appropriateness, question framing, response options, and follow-up field mobilization (school) by: C2. Carefully and properly format all questionnaires, tests, and answer sheets to ensure April 10, that they are user- and reader-friendly. C3. Translate into Urdu and relevant regional languages all survey and test instruments, Complete and administration documents and make them available with adequate time to follow-up field PMIU/WB for possible reverse translation. mobilization (household) by: C4. Mobilize teams of sufficient numbers, proficiency, fluency in relevant local April 24, languages, and professional integrity to handle the scope of work, including 2015. appropriate field-level managers, surveyors, project managers, quality-control monitors, and data entry operators. C5. Collect in standardized form and submit information on each field survey staff member (coordinators, managers, surveyors, etc.) to WB/PMIU. 9 Deliverable dates are indicative and subject to revision. C6. Assign unique and permanent identification numbers to all field survey personnel. C7. Organize and administer all required trainings of field survey personnel. C8. Make available all field survey personnel for possible additional trainings offered C9. Draft and translate all field survey manuals. C10. Make these field survey manuals available to firm survey staff at trainings and test knowledge of fieldwork procedures and acceptable behaviors. Submit test results to the WB/PMIU team. C11. Ensure that field survey personnel only comprise of individuals who pass the post- training survey knowledge test that may be conducted by the WB/PMIU team. C12. Manage all fieldwork logistics and make fieldwork planning available to the WB/PMIU team for review and pre-approval. C13. Develop field survey quality control protocols and procedures and submit to the WB/PMIU team for pre-approval. Mobilize an independent quality control unit to do random checks of at least 5% of each field survey personnel‟s interviews and investigate any quality control issues that arise. B. Data Collection D1. Pilot questionnaires and test instruments in a sub-sample of schools and Complete households as requested by the WB/PMIU team. Note that the list of schools, follow-up survey mouzas and settlements are included as Appendix B and Appendix C and that the (school) list of panel households will be provided to the survey firm by the PMIU and the fieldwork by: May 29, 2015. D2. Follow all directives and instructions from the WB/PMIU team with regards to Complete methodology, sampling, storage and data management of survey and test follow-up survey (household) fieldwork by: D3. Field each survey and test instrument in the manner in which it is intended. June 26, 2015. D4. Collect GPS data from all households visited during baseline and follow-up survey rounds, following the data collection protocols outlined by the WB/PMIU team. D5. Collect GPS data from all schools visited during baseline and follow-up survey rounds, following the data collection protocols outlined by the WB/PMIU team. D6. Maintain a field visit log of each household visited during the baseline and follow- up rounds, answering all questions therein. Also, maintain a field visit log of each school visited, answering all questions therein. D7. Ensure 100% assignment of unique and permanent identification information for enumeration areas, households and individuals therein, schools, teachers, and D8. Ensure the development and effective application well-defined, reliable procedures to track households and individuals therein, schools, sample teachers, and sample students over survey rounds. D9. Ensure quality control measures for data collection at the household level are applied in the baseline and follow-up rounds. Also, ensure quality control measures for data collection are applied at all schools in baseline and follow-up D10. Complete all information requested in daily and weekly field reports by the D11. Securely and safely maintain all paper questionnaires, tests, and other reporting forms from each household and school and make available to the WB/PMIU team upon request. D12. Be respectful at all times to respondents (parents, children, other members of the household, school administrators, teachers, students, etc.). D13. Fully abide with the principles, regulations, and policies which apply to research involving human subjects. In addition, fully abide with all safeguards for research of vulnerable groups such as children and economically- and educationally- disadvantaged persons. D14. Put in place appropriate protections so that the risks of invasion of privacy and breach of confidentiality are minimized. Follow all standard requirements for obtaining and documenting informed consent from each prospective subject (parent, child, other household member). In particular, make special provisions for soliciting the assent of children (taking account of the age, and maturity and comprehension levels of the child) and the permission of parents or guardians before initiating any data collection. Ensure that steps are taken to ensure that the data collection exercises are undertaken in a culturally-sensitive fashion. D15. Notify the WB/PMIU team, as soon as safety permits, of any security threat encountered during the course of field work, including, but not limited to, direct threats to the survey team, generalized threats during the course of field work, and spontaneous occurrences of insecurity during fieldwork or travel. C. Data entry & quality control E1. The firm will develop a data entry program for data entry. This program will Complete follow all inputs from the WB/PMIU team, including, but not limited to, oral and follow-up data written guidelines, data entry codebooks, and other advice. The data entry program entry and will be shared and tested with the WB/PMIU team prior to use. quality control (school) by: E2. Internally check the integrity and accuracy of data before transmitting to the June 19, 2015. E3. Provide preliminary data within 1 day of beginning data entry (this will serve as a follow-up data preliminary check of proper data entry). entry and quality control E4. Prepare data entry quality control protocols and procedures and submit the (school) by: July WB/PMIU team for pre-approval. Mobilize a quality control unit. 17, 2015. E5. Provide all logs and outputs of quality control checks done on data prior to transmitting to the WB/PMIU team. E6. Enter all data simultaneously using two different data entry units (double entry), with each unit under independent supervision. E7. If requested, reenter 10% of all survey questionnaires and tests as identified by the WB/PMIU team and test answers using a different team of data entry operators under the oversight of and following the instructions of the WB/PMIU team. E8. Correct any data entry errors as requested by the WB/PMIU team. E9. Maintain a data entry log as specified to record progress and issues with data entry. E10. Scan all paper questionnaires, tests and other forms and submit to the WB/PMIU team in an external hard drive. D. General F1. Maintain regular communication with WB/PMIU team via audioconference, videoconference, and email regarding all aspects of the survey preparation, data collection, and data entry process. F2. Seek pre-approval from the WB/PMIU team on all key decisions likely to impact the scope and quality of the survey work. F3. Provide timely feedback on all detailed assignments and instructions provided by the WB/PMIU team via phone or email. F4. Provide the WB/PMIU team with copies of its logistical planning and fielding documents as it relates to data collection and data entry activities for review and F5. Notify the WB/PMIU of any changes in personnel assigned to this project, including field surveyors, along with clear justifications. F6. To the extent possible, seek guidance from the WB/PMIU team before troubleshooting any sensitive/complex problems that arise during survey data collection and entry. F7. Strictly comply with all general independence, confidentiality, and professional integrity codes. Seek advice from the WB/PMIU team when uncertain about requirements and expectations in this regard. F8. Permit the WB/PMIU team or designated entities or individuals to monitor and inspect selected components or all of the process. Monitoring may take the form of unannounced visits to firm offices, training events, or while undertaking survey F9. If Computer Assisted Personal Interviewing (CAPI) with handheld devices (e.g., tablet computers) and electronic questionnaires are to be used, the firm will develop and test the necessary software. All equipment used as part of the survey (e.g., GPS handhelds, smartphones, tablets, digital cameras) is to be provided by the firm in the appropriate quantities and in full working order.

5.

Required outputs include but are not limited to the following. The WB/PMIU team also reserves the right to request revisions and resubmissions as needed. 1) All survey instruments, assessments, forms, and manuals prepared or revised by the firm. 2) Reports and logs from survey and test field-testing activities. 3) Logistics plans and timetables. 4) Quality control plans for survey and test data collection and data entry. 5) All logs, journals, and reports from fieldwork. 6) Field survey administration report. 7) Survey and test data in electronic format in agreed templates and statistical format. 8) All multimedia information in electronic formats, with clear organization. 9) Scanned survey questionnaires and tests. 10) Data entry and processing report. WORK TIMELINE
The timeline is summarized in Table 2. Note that this timeline may be subject to change. Action Item
Revised Dates
Fielding and completion of follow-up household survey April – June 2015 Fielding and completion of follow-up school survey April – May 2015 Evaluation Criteria
For this purpose, PMIU intends to hire the services of a firm which has proven relevant background
and experience working with the government. Evaluation criteria for evaluating the Expression of Interest (EOI) would be as follows: a. Firm experience (attach certificate of incorporation), including qualified key staff (25 marks). Definition of "Qualified Key Staff": A key staff is considered qualified if he/she satisfies all of the following specifications: (i) holds at least a Masters‟ degree; MA-5 scores, MPhil-6 scores, PhD-7 scores (ii) has at least 2 previous experiences in survey administration work where the survey questionnaire were administered to at least 1,200 individuals (irrespective of organizational unit); 10 scores (iii) in these prior survey experiences, he/she had similar roles and function as his/her role and function for the assignment under this REI: 8 scores In the same vein, a key staff is considered unqualified if he/she does not meet any one of the aforementioned specifications. This definition of qualified key staff applies to all parts of this REI. b. Up to three Qualifying Survey Experiences (25 marks for each qualified experience) Definition of "Qualified Survey Experience": A survey experience is considered qualified if it satisfies all of the following specifications: (i) it is relevant to this REI in terms of scope and tasks and responsibilities; 10 scores (ii) it was administered wholly or partly in Punjab; 5 scores (iii) it is a survey experience for which the firm took full responsibility of all stages of survey administration, including pre-testing, field mobilization, data collection, data entry and processing; 5 scores (iv) the survey questionnaire was administered to at least 1,200 individuals (irrespective of organizational unit) – i.e. at least 1,200 individuals were interviewed for the survey; 5 scores In the same vein, a survey experience is considered unqualified if it does not meet any one of the aforementioned specifications. This definition of qualified survey experience applies to all parts of the TOR.

Selection Method
The attention of interested consulting firms is drawn to paragraph 1.9 of the World Bank‟s [January 2011] ("Consultant Guidelines"), setting forth the World Bank‟s policy on conflict of interest. A consulting firm wil be selected in accordance with the Selection Based on Consultants Qualification (CQS) method set out in the World Bank‟s Guidelines: Selection and Employment of Consultants (under IBRD Loans & IDA Credits and Grants) by World Bank Borrowers (2011). A consulting firm may associate with other firms in the form of a joint venture or a sub consultancy to enhance their capability for carrying out the assignment fully, efficiently, and with quality. The applicant firm will be required to provide the following information during negotiations: 1. A brief description of a proposed survey implementation strategy. 2. A capacity statement for hiring and training sufficient numbers of personnel to complete all tasks. 3. Resumes for key technical personnel expected to be involved in the project. APPENDIX A: DESIGN NOTE

The distribution of stipends to female students is a key activity of the Punjab Education Sector Reform Program (PESRP) and the Second Punjab Education Sector Reform Program (PESRP II) to improve gender parity in access to education. The stipends program is targeted to girls enrolled in grades 6-10 in government schools in 16 districts with literacy rates below 40%, as per the 1998 Population Census data. In 2011-12, approximately 380,000 girls received stipends quarterly for a total cost of Rs. 1 billion. However, since its inception in 2004, the stipend amount had not been increased despite rising inflation. Considering the above, under PESRP II, the provincial government agreed to increase the benefit amount to strengthen the program‟s incentive effect obtained through the level of the benefit. To maximize the incentive effect, the increase in benefits was to be targeted to areas with low female school participation rates, a substantial rural population, and a relatively high share of poor students. In order to (i) increase school transitions of girls from primary schools to middle schools and from middle schools to secondary schools, and (ii) increase retention in grades 6-10, Phase II of the Supplemental Stipends Pilot in Punjab (SSPP-II) will phase in supplemental benefits tied to attendance and/or progression in selected school in 18 tehsils in 6 districts, namely DG Khan, KotChuta and Taunsa in DG Khan; Chaubara, KarorLalisan and Layyah in Layyah; DunyaPur, KarorPacca and Lodhran in Lodhran; Alipur, Jatoi and Muzaffargarh in Muzaffargarh; Khanpur, Rahimyar Khan and Sadiqabad in Rahimyar Khan; and Jampur, Rajanpur and Rojhan in Rajanpur.10 KotAdu in Muzaffargarh and Liaqatpur in Rahimyar Khan will not be included. Under SSPP-II, 702 rural government schools in around 3600 mauzas will be categorized into three groups ("Treatment I", "Treatment II" and "Control"). The following benefit structure will be offered to beneficiary girls in grades 6-10 in each of these groups: Girls in grades 6-8 will receive Rs. 900 per quarter based on 80% attendance. Girls in grades 9-10 will receive Rs. 1200 per quarter based on 80% attendance. Girls in grades 6-8 will receive Rs. 900 per quarter based on 80% attendance. 10 The region of KotChuta in DG Khan will be treated as a tehsil for the purpose of this design note. Girls in grade 9-10 receive Rs. 2400 upon progression to this grade based on 80% attendance in the first quarter of the school year + Rs. 1200 per quarter based on 80% attendance. Girls in grades 6-10will receive Rs. 600 per quarter based on 80% attendance. This is the same benefit structure as in the original stipends program. This benefit structure of Treatment I is motivated by the fact that the median private cost of schooling per girl child in middle grades is between Rs. 2600-Rs. 3800. Furthermore, a similar stipends program in Sindh has set benefit levels in low participation Talukas at Rs. 3600 per year. Based on this, a benefit amount of Rs. 3600 per year for girls in grades 6-8 is considered appropriate. Since the private cost of schooling is almost double for secondary grades than it is for middle grades, girls enrolled in grades in pilot 9-10 will be offered a higher quarterly benefit amount. Treatment II introduces additional incentive payments on grade progression because transition rates decline sharply for girls completing grade8. Given these considerations, girls progressing to grade 9 will be eligible to receive an additional benefit payment in lump sum, subject to 80 % attendance in the first quarter of the school year. Girls progressing to grade 9 will be eligible to receive a lump sum payment, too, to evaluate its effects at a less problematic transition. Phase II of the Supplemental Stipends Pilot follows Phase I in which the same financial incentive package as Treatment I is being piloted in 68 government schools for girls in Kasur and Bhakkar Districts. The pilot districts of Phase II will also be at the center of a rigorous impact evaluation of SSPP. This impact evaluation will analyze SSPP‟s effect on girls‟ school transition, retention, attendance and progression rates. The implementation will largely follow the procedures established for implementing Phase I. The first disbursements will be made against attendance in Q2 of 2014 (i.e. the period from April to June of that year). SSPP-II will run for at least three years. Evaluation Design
The pilot districts of Phase II will be at the center of a rigorous impact evaluation of SSPP. This impact evaluation will rely on an experimental setup and thus allow the identification of causal effects and cost-effectiveness of SSPP-II with respect to participation, progression and other key outcome variables. The design of the impact evaluation builds on the selection of districts/tehsils described below and comprises of the following major steps: (i) selection and formation of randomization units, (ii) blocking/stratifying of school clusters, (iii) randomized assignment of school clusters, and (iv) randomized encouragement design for within-cluster variation. In more detail: (i) Selection and formation of randomization units. Randomization will be at the "school cluster" level, where a "school cluster" will be defined as a girls‟ secondary school and all feeder schools for girls offering grades 6-8 as well as their catchment mauzas. Whole clusters will be randomly assigned to either Treatment I or Treatment II or Control (i.e. if a cluster is assigned to a treatment, all schools in that cluster will receive this same treatment). School clusters will be formed according to manually collected data on the catchment areas of secondary schools as well as GPS data on schools and mauzas in the pilot districts of Phase II. (ii) Blocking/stratifying of school clusters. Once school clusters are formed and validated, they will be stratified based on key metric(s) that determine outcome of interest and are important to understand from a policy and research viewpoint. (iii) Randomized assignment of school clusters. 25 % of school clusters will be randomly assigned to Treatment 1, 25 % to Treatment 2 and the remaining 50% to Control. Half of the control group clusters could potentially be offered a different treatment in the next year or later if agreed. Randomized assignment will either be performed with simple randomization or a more advanced procedure like matched quadruple randomization. (iv) Randomized encouragement design for within-cluster variation: To introduce within-"school cluster" variation, a randomized encouragement design is recommended. E.g., in every "school cluster" that is part of Treatment I, all mauzas will receive a standard "poster/banner" treatment but a certain portion of randomly selected mauzas will also receive a "community camp" that allows for face-to-face interaction and direct information sharing with parents. Since an awareness campaign is already envisaged, some variation in the design of this campaign, its targeting and its content is a feasible way to introduce within-"school-cluster" variation while staying within budget. Targeted Schools
District and tehsil selection for Phase II of SSPP was based on the following criteria: prior existence of stipend program, rurality, low school participation, minimum overlap with branchless banking pilot and separation from Phase-I districts. Based on these criteria, Phase II of SSPP will extend the supplemental stipends program toall 18 tehsils in 6 districts, namely Rajanpur, Muzaffargarh, DG Khan, Rahimyar Khan, Lodhran and Layyah. Functional Middle, High and Higher Secondary Schools for Girls in Rural locations of Rajanpur, Muzaffargarh, DG Khan, Rahimyar Khan, Lodhran and Layyahare eligible for the SSPP-II. Eligibility here means that they are eligible to be considered for randomization to either Treatment I or Treatment II or Control. The exact eligibility criteria for schools in the 6 districtsareas follows: (i) Only schools designated as girls‟ "middle", "high" and "higher secondary" in the 2013-14 Annual School Census (ASC) are eligible for participation. This is irrespective of current enrollment. (ii) Only girls‟ middle, high and higher secondary that are designated as "rural" in the ASC are eligible for participation. (iii) Only schools whose status in the ASC is "functional" are eligible. The only exceptions to this case is if a school is expected to become functional in the near future. (iv) Schools designated as girls‟ middle, high and higher secondary and location denoted as rural in ASC, but having non-zero male enrollment in grades 6-8, are still eligible. (v) Schools designated as boys‟ middle, high and higher secondary and location denoted as rural in ASC, but having non-zero female enrollment in grades 6-8, are not eligible. This exclusion is made for reasons of administrative ease. A list of the 659 participating schools selected according to these five criteria can be found in Annex B. APPENDIX B: LIST OF SCHOOLS
District
EMIS Code
D. G. Khan
GGHS CHOTI ZAREEN D. G. Khan
D. G. Khan
GGHS SHADAN LUND D. G. Khan
D. G. Khan
GGHS YAROO KHOSA D. G. Khan
D. G. Khan
GGHS SHAH SADAR DIN D. G. Khan
GGHS SAKHI SARWAR D. G. Khan
D. G. Khan
GGES Makore Wala D. G. Khan
D. G. Khan
GGES BASTI KHAKHI GHARBI D. G. Khan
GGES Chanar Wala D. G. Khan
D. G. Khan
D. G. Khan
D. G. Khan
GGES Basti Malana D. G. Khan
D. G. Khan
GGES CHABRI BALA D. G. Khan
GGES CHURATA NO. 3 D. G. Khan
GGES BASTI CLAIRY D. G. Khan
GGES BASTI SHEIKHANI D. G. Khan
GGES Bahadur Garh D. G. Khan
GGES TIBBI ESRAN D. G. Khan
GGES KOT DAUD MUZA MIRHATA D. G. Khan
D. G. Khan
D. G. Khan
GGES BASTI KHOSA D. G. Khan
D. G. Khan
D. G. Khan
GGES SAKHI SARWAR (B) D. G. Khan
GGES Gago Sharif D. G. Khan
GGES CHAK RAIMAN D. G. Khan
D. G. Khan
GGES GUJAR WALA NO. 1 D. G. Khan
GGES CHAH MASOO KHAN D. G. Khan
GGES MUHAMMAD KHAN HOTANI D. G. Khan
D. G. Khan
D. G. Khan
D. G. Khan
GGHS KORA BHOUNCHRY D. G. Khan
GGES Chan Masoori Wala D. G. Khan
GGES KHALIL ABAD D. G. Khan
GGES GADAI WALA NO. 2 D. G. Khan
D. G. Khan
GGES RANJHAY WALI D. G. Khan
D. G. Khan
GGES BASTI ALYANI D. G. Khan
GGHS KOT MUBARAK D. G. Khan
GGHSS Kot Chutta D. G. Khan
GGHS JHOKE UTTRA D. G. Khan
GGHSS MANA AHMADANI D. G. Khan
GGES NO. 3 CHOTI ZAREEN D. G. Khan
GGES NAWAN SHEHR D. G. Khan
GGES HAJI KAMAND D. G. Khan
GGES Bashir Tal Pur D. G. Khan
GGES GORISTANI WALA D. G. Khan
GGES BASTI BIRMANI D. G. Khan
GGHS NOTAK MAHMEED D. G. Khan
GGHS KOT QAISRANI D. G. Khan
GGHS TIBBI QAISRANI D. G. Khan
D. G. Khan
D. G. Khan
GGHS BASTI BUZDAR D. G. Khan
D. G. Khan
GGHS MAKWAL KALAN D. G. Khan
D. G. Khan
D. G. Khan
GGHS MANGROTHA EAST D. G. Khan
D. G. Khan
D. G. Khan
D. G. Khan
GGES BHUTTY WALI D. G. Khan
D. G. Khan
GGES MANGORTHA GHARBI D. G. Khan
GGES BUGHLANI DEH D. G. Khan
GGES HAIRO GHARBI D. G. Khan
D. G. Khan
GGES BASTI PIR DEH D. G. Khan
GGES NARI JANOOBI D. G. Khan
D. G. Khan
D. G. Khan
D. G. Khan
GGES BAMBHAN NO 1 D. G. Khan
D. G. Khan
D. G. Khan
D. G. Khan
GGES GADDI NO. 2 D. G. Khan
GGES BOHAR NO. 2 D. G. Khan
D. G. Khan
GGES LISHARI NUTKANI D. G. Khan
D. G. Khan
GGES BASTI YASEEN D. G. Khan
D. G. Khan
GGHS CHAK NO. 377/TDA GGHS Chak No. 330/TDA GGES Chak No. 475/TDA GGES Chak No. 413/TDA GGES Chak No. 315/TDA GGES Chak No. 344/TDA GGES Chak No. 402/TDA GGES Chak No. 492/TDA GGES CHAK NO. 126/ML GGHS CHAK NO. 408/TDA GGHS CHAK NO. 347/TDA GGES Chak No. 364/TDA GGES Chak No. 314/TDA GGES Chak No. 325/TDA GGES CHAK NO. 373/TDA GGES CHAK NO. 441/TDA GGES Chak No. 411/TDA GGES CHAK NO. 484/TDA GGES ADDA MOCHI WALA GGCMES 369-A/TDA GGHS CHAK NO. 94/TDA GGHS Chak No. 218/TDA GGHS Chak No. 98/ML GGHS Chak No. 90/ML GGES Chak No. 101/TDA GGHS Wara Sehran GGES Gara Jan Muhammad GGHS CHAK NO. 110/TDA GGES Chak No. 84/TDA GGES CHAK NO. 109/TDA GGES CHAK NO. 102/TDA GGHS CHAK NO. 104/ML GGES CHAK NO. 112/TDA GGHS CHAK NO. 82/TDA GGES HAIDER SHAH WALA GGES CHAK NO. 251/TDA GGHS Chak No. 234-A/TDA GGHS Chak No. 237/TDA GGES Chak No. 115/ML GGHS Chak No. 250/TDA GGES Chak No. 263/TDA GGES CHAK NO. 290/TDA GGHS CHAK NO. 293/TDA GGHS Chak No. 100/ML GGHS Chak No. 94/ML GGES Chak No. 228A/TDA GGES Chak No. 92/ML GGES Chak No. 75B/TDA GGHS Chak No. 82/ML GGES CHAK NO. 306/TDA GGES Chak No. 227-B/TDA GGES DIN PUR OLD GGES CHAK NO. 78/TDA GGES CHAK NO. 83/TDA GGES CHAK NO. 85-A/TDA GGES MARRAHAN WALI GGES Chak No. 85/TDA GGES CHAK NO. 107/TDA GGES BHUMB WALA 114/T GGHS CHAK NO. 114/TDA GGES CHAK NO. 115-B/TDA GGES Basti Pitafi GGES CHAK NO. 103/ML GGES CHAK NO. 98/TDA GGES Shehin Wala GGES CHAK NO. 226/TDA GGES Chak No. 79/TDA GGES Chak No. 88/ML GGES Chak No. 222A/TDA GGES Chak No. 101/ML GGES Chak No. 106/ML GGES Chak No. 112/ML GGHS Chak No. 92/TDA GGHS Chak No. 109/ML GGES Chak No. 85/ML GGES CHAK NO. 93/ML GGES Chak No. 96/ML GGES Chak No. 217/TDA GGHS Chak No. 224/TDA GGES Chak No. 234/TDA GGES Chak No. 240/TDA GGES Chak 307/TDA GGES Chak No. 86/ML GGES Chak No. 75/TDA GGES Laskani Wala GGES CHAK NO. 91/TDA GGES Chak No. 107/ML GGHS CHAK NO. 268/TDA GGHS Chak No. 279/TDA GGHS Chak No. 173/TDA GGHS Khokhar Wala GGHS Chak No. 124/TDA GGHS Chak No. 156/TDA GGHS Kotla Haji Shah GGHS Chak No. 121/TDA GGHS CHAK NO. 459/TDA GGHS CHAK NO. 141/TDA GGES Chak No. 388/TDA GGES CHAK NO. 432/TDA GGES CHAK NO. 431/TDA GGES Chak No. 132/TDA GGES Chak No. 341/TDA GGES CHAK NO. 457/TDA GGHS Chak No. 130/TDA GGES CHAK NO. 427/TDA GGHS Chak No. 133/TDA GGES CHAK NO. 357-A/TDA GGES Chak No. 401/TDA GGES Chak No. 155/TDA GGES CHAK NO. 278-A/TDA GGES CHAK NO. 426-B/TDA GGHS CHAK NO. 434/TDA GGHS Chak No. 162/TDA GGES CHAK NO. 171/TDA GGHS Chak No. 174/TDA GGHS JAISAL KALASRA GGES BAIT WASAWA SHUMALI GGES Haji Yaar Muhammad GGHS Bakhri Ahmed Khan GGES KHARAL AZIM GGHS Chak No. 152/TDA GGES Chak No. 153/TDA GGES Chak No. 138/TDA GGHS Jamman Shah GGES Chak No. 125-A/TDA GGHS Chak No. 146/TDA GGES Chak No. 153A/TDA GGES Chak No. 134/TDA GGHS Chak No. 135/TDA GGES CHAK NO. 117/TDA GGHS Chak No. 127/TDA GGHS Chak No. 117/TDA GGES Chak No. 126/TDA GGES BASTI SHADU KHAN GGES CHAK NO. 419/TDA GGES CHAK NO. 463/TDA GGES Chak No. 339/TDA GGES Chak No. 388A/TDA GGES CHAK NO. 160-B/TDA GGES AMIR MUHAMMAD MOLWANA GGES CHAK NO. 172/TDA GGES Haibat Wala GGES Chak No. 139/TDA GGES CHAK NO. 149-A/TDA GGHS Chak No. 128A/TDA GGES CHAK NO. 150-A/TDA GGES CHAK NO. 154-A/TDA GGES Koro Mugassi Wala GGES Chak No. 120/TDA GGES Chak 149-B/TDA GGES BASTI MIRANI LOHANCH NASHAIB GGES Khuda Bukhsh Dullo Wala GGCMES CHAK No. 139-A/TDA GGES Chak No. 353/TDA GGHS Chak No. 336/TDA GGES Chak No. 425/TDA GGES Chak No. 438/TDA GGES Chak No. 148/TDA GGES Abbadi Gurmani GGHSS JALLAH ARIAN GGHSS CHAK NO. 365/WB GGHSS Chak No. 358/WB GGHSS Chak No. 35/M GGHS Chak No. 227/WB GGHS Chak No. 363/WB GGHS Chak No. 362/WB GGHS Chak No. 297/WB GGES Chak No. 16/M GGES Chak No. 344/WB GGHS Chak No. 281-83/WB GGES Chak No. 26/M GGES Chak No. 343/WB GGHS CHAK NO. 355/WB GGES CHAK NO. 359/WB GGES Chak No. 23/M GGES Dolla Arain GGHS Chak No. 253/WB GGHS CHAK NO. 357/WB GGHS Chak 319/WB GGES Chak 351/WB GGHS Chak No. 279/WB GGES Chak No. 313/WB GGES Chak No. 346/WB GGHS MAKHDOOM AALI GGHS CHAK NO. 360/WB GGHS CHAK NO. 377/WB GGES Chak 384/WB GGHS CHAK NO. 375/WB GGES Chak 376/WB GGES Chak No. 372/WB GGES Chak No. 356/WB GGES Chak No. 37/M GGES Chak No. 321/WB GGES Chak No. 354/WB GGES Chak No. 339/WB GGES Chak No. 348/WB GGES Chak 315/WB GGES Chak No. 353/WB GGES Chak No. 301/WB GGES Chak No. 219/WB GGES Chak No. 3/M GGES Chak No. 370/WB GGES Chak No. 364/WB GGES Chak 378/WB GGES Chak 381/WB No. GGES CHAK NO. 389/WB GGES Chak 371/WB GGES Chak 383/WB GGES Chak 379/WB GGES Chak No. 380/WB GGES CHOKI RANGO KHAN GGES AMEER PUR SADAT GGES CHOWKI MASTI KHAN GGHS MASSA KOTHA KEHROR PACCA GGES BASTI LAIL PUR GGES CHELLY WAHIN GMES SHAH PUR PHUL GGES KHAN DA KHOO GGES MARI BAGHO KHAN GGHSS Adam Wahin GGHS Chak No. 53/M GGHS Qureshi Wala GGES Havali Naseer Khan GGES Chak Lahori GGHS Chak No. 49/M GGHS Chak Himtha GGHS WAHI ALI ARAIN GGHS Abdullah Pur GGES Chum Kulyar GGHS GALLAY WALA GGHS KHANWAH GHALWAN GGES DAULLAT PUR GGES Thathi Smja WAHI SALAMAT ROY GGES Kot Peer Sadat GGES Basti Lal Kamal GGES Chak No. 93/M GGES BASTI GHALWAN GGES BASTI ARIAN GGES BAHMANI WALA GGES SHAHNAL STATION GGES Kot Lal Shah GGES Haleem Wala GGES Bhutta Sadat GGES Wahi Waryam GGHS Khairpur Sadat GGES Basti Azeem Shah GGHS Phullan Sharif GGES Thaheemwala GGES Ghabar Arain GGES RAHIM ABAD KHANANI GGHS MIR HAZAR KHAN GGES RAM PUR JADEED (MAHI WAL NAGAR) GGES KANDH SHARIF GGES BHINDI KORAI GGES DAMMAR WALA SHUMALI GGES SHABIR ABAD GGES KALLAR WALI NO. 2 GGCMES HAMZAY WALI GGES BASTI JANGLA GGES KOTLA GAMOON GGHS KHANPUR BAGGA SHER GGHS KARAM DAD QURESHI GGES Basti Arslan GGES Jada Chandia GGES Basti Gazraan GGHS KHANGAN SHUMALI GGES CHAK NO. 3/4-R GGHS SHARIF CHAGRA GGES USMAN KORIA GGES Basti Darigh GGES KALLAR WALA GGES SAEED NAGAR GGCMS BADLAY WALA GGES THATHA SIALAN GGCMES ALI PUR SHUMALI GGES BHUTTA ABAD GGES Langar Sarai GGES NAWAN NOOR SHAH GGES AHMAD MOHANA NO.2 GGES Basti Chandia GGES KANERAY WALA GGES BAIT QAIM SHAH GGES RAQBA NOOR KHAN R. Y. Khan
GGHS FATEH PUR KAMAL R. Y. Khan
GGHS CHACHRAN SHARIF R. Y. Khan
GGHS CHAK NO. 31/P BAGHO BAHAR R. Y. Khan
GGHS CHAK NO. 7/P R. Y. Khan
GGHS CHAK NO. 45/P R. Y. Khan
GGES CHAK NO. 8/P R. Y. Khan
R. Y. Khan
GGES DIN PUR SHARIF R. Y. Khan
GGES CHAK NO. 12/P JETHA BHUTTA R. Y. Khan
GGHS GHARHI IKHTIAR KHAN R. Y. Khan
GGHS KOTLI MURAD R. Y. Khan
GGES KOTLA PATHAN R. Y. Khan
R. Y. Khan
R. Y. Khan
GGES BASTI HAJI ABDULLAH R. Y. Khan
GGHS Chak No. 121/1-L R. Y. Khan
GGHS BASTI SHAIR MUHAMMAD R. Y. Khan
GGES CHAK NO. 103/1-L R. Y. Khan
GGES BASTI KHAN MUHAMMAD R. Y. Khan
GGES CHAK 109/1-L R. Y. Khan
GGES LALOO WALA NO. 1 R. Y. Khan
GGES BASTI PANWARAN R. Y. Khan
GGES BASTI ABDUL SALAM R. Y. Khan
R. Y. Khan
GGES Chak No. 17/P R. Y. Khan
GGES ATA MUHAMMAD PO DHANDO R. Y. Khan
GGES MAKHAN BELA R. Y. Khan
GGES SHER GERH PO ZAHIR PEER R. Y. Khan
GGES CHAK NO. 35/P KHANPUR R. Y. Khan
GGES CHAK NO. 63/P R. Y. Khan
GGES DERA MUHAMMAD ISMAIL R. Y. Khan
GGES CHAK NO. 94/NP R. Y. Khan
GGES CHAK NO.120/1-L R. Y. Khan
GGES CHAK NO.92/1-L R. Y. Khan
GGES Chak No. 129/1-L R. Y. Khan
GGES Chak No. 107 1-L R. Y. Khan
GGES CHAK NO.10/P R. Y. Khan
GGES KOT SHER MOHAMMAD R. Y. Khan
R. Y. Khan
GGES MUHAMMAD KHAN R. Y. Khan
GGES Chak No. 69/P R. Y. Khan
R. Y. Khan
GGES CHAK NO. 111/NP R. Y. Khan
R. Y. Khan
GGES Chak No. 27/P R. Y. Khan
GGES CHAK NO. 93/1-L R. Y. Khan
GGES CHAK NO. 9/P R. Y. Khan
GGHSS CHAK NO. 1/P R. Y. Khan
R. Y. Khan
R. Y. Khan
GGHS CHAK NO. 140/P R. Y. Khan
GGHS CHAK NO. 125/P R. Y. Khan
GGHS CHAK NO. 118/P R. Y. Khan
GGHS CHAK NO. 113/P R. Y. Khan
GGHS CHAK NO. 51/P R. Y. Khan
GGHS ABU ZAHBI COLONY NO 1 R. Y. Khan
GGHSS TRANDA SAWAY KHAN R. Y. Khan
GGHS Chak No. 100/P R. Y. Khan
GGHS RAJAN PUR KALAN R. Y. Khan
GGHS FATEH PUR ARAIN R. Y. Khan
GGES HASSAN COLONY R. Y. Khan
GGES Ali Akbar Sanghi R. Y. Khan
GGES Chak No. 46/P R. Y. Khan
GGES Chak No. 47/P R. Y. Khan
GGES CHAK NO. 55/P R. Y. Khan
GGES Chak No. 82/P R. Y. Khan
GGES CHAK No. 86/P R. Y. Khan
GGES CHAK NO. 92/P R. Y. Khan
GGES MISSAN ABAD R. Y. Khan
R. Y. Khan
GGES ABDULLAH PUR R. Y. Khan
GGHS CHAK NO. 143/P R. Y. Khan
R. Y. Khan
GGES BASTI SHARIF R. Y. Khan
R. Y. Khan
GGES Mianwali Sheikhan R. Y. Khan
GGHS SARDAR GARH R. Y. Khan
GGES Chak No. 110/P R. Y. Khan
R. Y. Khan
GGES MOUZA CHANNA R. Y. Khan
GGHS MAU MUBARAK R. Y. Khan
GGES Wahi Shah Mohammad R. Y. Khan
GGES BASTI QADIR BAKHSH BHAGWALA R. Y. Khan
GGES MAD NOOR KOT SAMABA R. Y. Khan
GGES TIBBI GUL MUHAMMAD R. Y. Khan
GGES Chak No. 78/P R. Y. Khan
GGES Chak No. 87/P R. Y. Khan
GGES CHAK NO. 99/P R. Y. Khan
GGES Chak No. 101/P R. Y. Khan
GGHS Chak No. 102/P R. Y. Khan
GGES MANZOOR ABAD R. Y. Khan
GGES KOT DARRI AZEEM KHAN R. Y. Khan
GGES CHAK NO. 126/P R. Y. Khan
GGES CHAK NO. 136/P R. Y. Khan
GGES CHAK NO. 137/P R. Y. Khan
GGES CHAK NO. 142/P R. Y. Khan
GGES CHAK NO. 144/P EAST R. Y. Khan
GGES CHAK NO. 114/P R. Y. Khan
GGES DERA SHAMAS R. Y. Khan
R. Y. Khan
R. Y. Khan
GGES CHAK NO. 133/P R. Y. Khan
GGES CHAK NO. 247/P R. Y. Khan
GGCMES MANZOOR ABAD (BINDOOR) R. Y. Khan
GGES CHAK NO. 106/P R. Y. Khan
GGES BASHEER AHMED SANGHI R. Y. Khan
GGES Tranda Ali Murad R. Y. Khan
GGCMS DUNIYA PUR GANGA BASTI YAR MUHAMMAD R. Y. Khan
GGES ABDUL RAHMAN WEEHA R. Y. Khan
GGES ALLAH DITTA KHAN R. Y. Khan
R. Y. Khan
GGES BASTI IMAM DIN R. Y. Khan
R. Y. Khan
GGES AZEEM BUKHSH DHAREEJA R. Y. Khan
GGES BADLI SHARIF R. Y. Khan
R. Y. Khan
GGHSS CHAK NO. 56/P R. Y. Khan
GGHS WAPDA SCORP RYK R. Y. Khan
GGPS Kot Karam Khan R. Y. Khan
GGCMES DARI ALI AKBAR SANGHI R. Y. Khan
GGHS MODEL ABU ZAHBI PALACE CHAK 55/P R. Y. Khan
GGHS MEHMOOD ABAD R. Y. Khan
GGHS Chak No. 195/P R. Y. Khan
GGHS Chak No. 146/P R. Y. Khan
GGHS Chak No. 156/P R. Y. Khan
GGHS Chak No. 158/P R. Y. Khan
GGHS Jamal Din Wali R. Y. Khan
GGHS BASTI HAMID ULLAH BHATTI R. Y. Khan
GGHS AHMAD PUR LAMMA R. Y. Khan
GGES GHARI BEGHAR R. Y. Khan
GGES Chak No. 120/P R. Y. Khan
GGES Chak No. 128/P R. Y. Khan
GGES Chak No. 238/P R. Y. Khan
GGES Chak No. 148/P R. Y. Khan
R. Y. Khan
GGHS Chak No. 145/P R. Y. Khan
GGES Chak No. 160/P R. Y. Khan
GGES Chak No. 173/P R. Y. Khan
GGES Chak No. 193/P R. Y. Khan
GGES Chak No. 188/P R. Y. Khan
GGES BHONG SHARIF R. Y. Khan
GGES METHA DANDAM R. Y. Khan
R. Y. Khan
GGES CHAK NO. 199/P R. Y. Khan
GGES Chak No. 197/P R. Y. Khan
GGES SUBZAL PO KOT SABZAL R. Y. Khan
GGES MUHAMMAD NAWAZ WASA R. Y. Khan
R. Y. Khan
GGES PEER BUKHASH PUNJABI R. Y. Khan
GGCMES MUHAMMAD PUR LAMMA R. Y. Khan
GGES ROSHAN BHAIT R. Y. Khan
GGHS BASTI KAMAM R. Y. Khan
GGES Chak No. 25/NP R. Y. Khan
R. Y. Khan
GGES Chak No. 164/P R. Y. Khan
GGES Chak No. 151/P R. Y. Khan
GGES Chak No. 119/P R. Y. Khan
GGES WALHAR PO WALHAR R. Y. Khan
GGES Chak No. 7/NP R. Y. Khan
GGHS CHAK NO. 11/NP R. Y. Khan
GGES MALIK WAHID BUX R. Y. Khan
R. Y. Khan
GGES KOTLA HAYAT R. Y. Khan
GGES Bhutta Wahan R. Y. Khan
GGES Shahbaz Pur R. Y. Khan
GGCMES SONA GOTH Rajanpur
GGHS Kotla Mughalan Rajanpur
Rajanpur
Rajanpur
GGHS BASTI CHINA Rajanpur
GGHS MUHAMMAD PUR Rajanpur
GGHS Noshera Gharbi Rajanpur
Rajanpur
Rajanpur
GGES Saleem Abad Rajanpur
Rajanpur
GGES Mastoi Wala Rajanpur
GGES BASTI TUFQI Rajanpur
GGES TIBBI LUNDAN Rajanpur
Rajanpur
GGES Bukhara Shareef Rajanpur
GGCMES KOTLA DEWAN Rajanpur
Rajanpur
GGES MUD JAM DUR MUHAMMAD Rajanpur
Rajanpur
GGCMES TATAR WALA Rajanpur
GGHS SIKHANI WALA Rajanpur
Rajanpur
GGHS KOTLA NASEER Rajanpur
GGES KOTLA SHER MUHAMMAD Rajanpur
Rajanpur
Rajanpur
Rajanpur
GGES Pati Juma Arain Rajanpur
GGES KOTLA MALAM Rajanpur
GGES Hazrat Wala Rajanpur
Rajanpur
GGES Kotla Androon Rajanpur
GGES Noshera Sharqi Rajanpur
Rajanpur
Rajanpur
GGES CHAH LAL KHAN Rajanpur
GGES BASTI PHALI Rajanpur
GGES Bukhari Shareef Rajanpur
GGES RAQBA NABI SHAH Rajanpur
Rajanpur
Rajanpur
GGES KOTLA HUSSAIN SHAH Rajanpur
GGES MOLVI MACHIAN Rajanpur
GGCMES SHAUKAT ABAD
APPENDIX C: LIST OF MAUZAS AND SETTLEMENTS

DISTRICT
SETTLEMENT NAME
BASTI AHMAD WALI BASTI PUL PAYARE WALI BASTI PUL PAYARE WALI CHORAHTTA PACHADH BASTI CHORAHTTA PACHADH BASTI BANGALI (S) BASTI KHO IMAM BAKSH BASTI CHAH KHOSAY WALA BASTI KAPPAR SHAH BASTI JHANG WANI BASTI BALOCH WALA BASTI HUSSAIN SHAMALI BASTI RAKH SHAWANI BASTI BAGIR WALI BASTI BABAR WALA BASTI KHO RASHEED WALA BASTI ALI SHAH11 BASTI CHAH HASAN WALA BASTI MEER JALBANI DARKHAST JAMAL KHAN GHERBI 2 BASTI BABAR WALA DARKHAST JAMAL KHAN JANUBI 1 JAKHER IMAM SHAH BASTI CHAH MEHMAR WALA BASTI JHOK UTTRA MOOR BASTI KHOURLAY WALA 11 This settlement could not be visited during the baseline survey because of flooding. The random walk procedure described in Appendix D is to be used to draw 10 „eligible‟ households. BASTI RASHEED ABAD BASTI TUB JANOBI BASTI GAMAN WALI BASTI LANGER WALI BASTI GAHBE JANOB MASRIK BASTI LARRI NAWAZ BASTI MOHALLAH KOT CHTTANWKANI BASTI SHEHLANI SHARQI BASTI BASHKY WALA SHARQLI BASTI ALLAH RAKHA BASTI KANJOO WALI BASTI CHAH MUSTAFA ABAD BASTI BUZDAR WALA RAKH KOT QAISRANI BASTI KOT QAISRANI BASTI HAYDAR BHUT BASTI FAMOUS TAN BASTI SHEIKH GURDA GHRBI BASTI PALOWAN JHOK BASTI BALOCH JANOB BASTI CHAKL WALI BASTI SAYDAN WALI BASTI KIRAARI KHOO BASTI Chak No. 444 BASTI DERA MAHAR KHADIM HUSSAIN BASTI Chak No. 488 BASTI Chak No. 489 RAKH NAWAN KOT JADID RAKH NAWAN KOT JADID BASTI CHATREE BALOCH BASTI DERA NASIR MAKEEN WALA Chak No. 110/TDA Chak No. 116/TDA Chak No. 233/TDA Chak No. 236/TDA Chak No. 241/TDA BASTI CHAK 241/TDA Chak No. 246/TDA Chak No. 266 TDA Chak No. 290/TDA Chak No. 293/TDA BASTI DERA BUKHARI 78 TDA Chak No. 90 A/TDA BASTI DIRKHAN WALI KAROR THAL JANDI BASTI BHUMBH WALA BASTI AWAN MOLVI BASTI CHAK SHAHANI BASTI GHULAM MUHAMMAD WALA BASTI NUSRAT WALA BASTI GANTI KORIAL BASTI SARGANI SOLANG TIBBI KHURD NASHEB TIBBI KHURD NASHEB BASTI SHARAN WALA JOHAR TIBI KALAN NASHEB BASTI WADHAY WALY OLD BAHADAR GAMAN SOHAL SHRKI BASTI LURKY WALA BAHADAR GARMOON SOHAL GHARDI BAHADAR GARMOON SOHAL GHARDI BASTI TULFEY NO 2 CHAK NO. 114 A/TDA BASTI CHA HUSSAIN BUKSH CHAK NO. 118/TDA BASTI CHEMMO KHO CHAK NO. 123 B/TDA CHAK NO. 136/TDA Basti Khoh Bijah CHAK NO. 141/TDA BASTI CHAK ABADI CHAK NO. 151/TDA CHAK NO. 152A/TDA BASTI CHAH HAYIDAR WALA CHAK NO. 274/TDA CHAK NO. 275/TDA CHAK NO. 279/TDA BASTI JANUBI BLOCK CHAK 279 CHAK NO. 280 TDA CHAK NO. 282 TDA BASTI KHOH MOOSA WALA CHAK NO. 287/TDA BASTI CHEEMA CHOWK CHAK NO. 288/TDA BASTI CHAK ABADI CHAK NO. 383/TDA BASTI DARKHAN Wali CHAK NO. 423/TDA CHAK NO. 460/TDA BASTI CHAH ARSHD WALA CHAK NO. 463/TDA BASTI CHAK ABADI BASTI CHAH SAEED SARGANI BASTI KODTHEY WALI BASTI DUNGI WALA BASTI CHAH LOHARI JHORAR THAL JANDI KHARL AZEEM THAL KALAN KHARL AZEEM THAL KALAN BASTI SANDY WALI KHAWAS KHAIL NASHEEB BASTI CHROHIY WALA KHLINI KARLU THAL BASTI CHAH LANGAR WALA BASTI KORAY SHAH WALA KOTLA HAJI SHAH THAL BASTI NOOR FAQIR BASTI CHAH KHELLO WALI BASTI DERA MOSHIN SHAH BASTI GUL MUHAMMAD PANAHA KHARL SHAKI BASTI DAR KHAN WALA BASTI KHOTEY WALA BASTI MASQUE FAROOQ AZAM BASTI CHAH VIDDA BASTI BATH COLONY BASTI CHAK 251 WB Chak No. 275-77/WB BASTI HAFIZ TALIB BASTI HAFIZ TALIB BASTI 5 MARLA SCHEME BASTI 5 MARLA SCHEME BASTI CAVNI ALA (BASTI ASLAM JHEDA) BASTI BAHISTI KHOO MUHALLAH DHAKHY WALA BASTI KABEER PUR COLONY BASTI MORAN WALI BASTI BOTAY WALA BASTI MUGHAL PURA BASTI NEEM WALI MAGA BASTI FAROOQABAD BASTI MAHRUF WALA BASTI BHAPPIR WALA BASTI 4 BHALLY WALA BASTI ALLAH DIHA + MANGO ORCHARD BASTI 22 MPR SECTION 2 BASTI KOSHALY WALA BASTI MARLA SCHEME BASTI ALLAH WASSAYA NAI BASTI DHANNU WALA BASTI AKRAM ABAD BASTI PATHAN WALA BASTI CHAH KOKARY WALA BASTI MAKHDOOM PUR BASTI STATION SHANAL BASTI MAMMO WALA BASTI PALLI WALA BASTI QAVRI WALA BASTI BASHKY WALA SHARQLI BASTI CHAH MITHA BASTI MAZAAR WALA BAQIR SHAH SHUMALI DAMAR WALA JANOBI 2 BASTI MUNKHEER 2 BASTI RAGGAR & BABBAR BASTI BASTI PEERO SHAHI BASTI KANDAYI MOR BASTI KAMHAR & MAHAJAR Basti Kabel Wala BASTI ALLAH BUKSH Basti Arif Wala/ Dora Wala Basti Dahlan Wala KALLAR WALI NO. 2 BASTI MALAK ABAD Basti Chachara Wala Basti Khare Wala Basti Wasti Wala Basti Hafiz Wala Basti Essa Korai BASTI ARAIN WALA BASTI DARKHAN WALA BASTI SHAIR WALA BASTI CHAK 2/6 R BASTI CHAK 5/4 L BASTI CHAK 6/4 R BASTI NAI (KABIR SANDILA) BASTI HASAN CHOWK COLONY BASTI THAHEEM WALA Basti Bhambay Wala Basti Lunger Saray BASTI DHARAM SAL BASTI ALLAH ABAD Basti Flood Band Basti Khajar Wala QABOOL CHAJRA SHUMAL BASTI SARIAN WALA BASTI ALI MUHAMMAD SARVAR BASTI KHADIM KHA WALA BASTI LAHAOH WALA Basti Saadat Colony Basti Tibi Balochan Basti Thaheem Nagar Basti Jewan Wala Basti Kundi Wala Basti Arain Wala BASTI PATHAN WALA BASTI FAIZ COLONY Basti Gahne Wala BASTI CHAH MULAN Rahim Yar Khan
Rahim Yar Khan
CHACHARAN SHARIF BASTI HAGI GHULAM SERWAR GOPANG Rahim Yar Khan
CHACHARAN SHARIF BASTI KHURACHIYAN Rahim Yar Khan
CHACHARAN SHARIF BASTI SONARY WALA BORANG Rahim Yar Khan
Rahim Yar Khan
BASTI KHUDA BUX SANGHRI Rahim Yar Khan
Chak No. 108 1-L BASTI SHAIKH MUHAMMAD Rahim Yar Khan
MALIK RAHIM BUKSH Rahim Yar Khan
Chak No. 118 1-L BASTI KAREEM BAKSH Rahim Yar Khan
Chak No. 123 1-L Rahim Yar Khan
BASTI CHAK ASHRIF Rahim Yar Khan
Rahim Yar Khan
Rahim Yar Khan
Rahim Yar Khan
BASTI ALI AHMED BABA Rahim Yar Khan
Rahim Yar Khan
Chak No. 7-0 ABBASIYA GHULSHAN USMAN COLONY Rahim Yar Khan
Rahim Yar Khan
BASTI HAJI GULZAR Rahim Yar Khan
Rahim Yar Khan
Basti haider khan Rahim Yar Khan
Markiz jamea imam deen pur Rahim Yar Khan
Rahim Yar Khan
BASTI RIAS SAEED AHMED Rahim Yar Khan
BASTI ALLAH DAD KHAN Rahim Yar Khan
Rahim Yar Khan
BASTI SULTAN ARAIN Rahim Yar Khan
Rahim Yar Khan
Rahim Yar Khan
Rahim Yar Khan
BASTI MUNSHI GHULAM NABI LAR Rahim Yar Khan
Rahim Yar Khan
PEER BUKSH KORAI Rahim Yar Khan
PEER BUKSH KORAI Rahim Yar Khan
Rahim Yar Khan
Rahim Yar Khan
Rahim Yar Khan
Rahim Yar Khan
BASTI Aman Garh Khas Rahim Yar Khan
Rahim Yar Khan
Rahim Yar Khan
Rahim Yar Khan
Rahim Yar Khan
Rahim Yar Khan
Chak 134 P Tibba Rahim Yar Khan
Rahim Yar Khan
Rahim Yar Khan
Basti Bahadar Ali Rahim Yar Khan
Basti Lal Bakhsh Rahim Yar Khan
Dastageer Colony Rahim Yar Khan
Basti Choudhary Asrar Rahim Yar Khan
Basti Ismail Puri Rahim Yar Khan
Rahim Yar Khan
Rahim Yar Khan
Rahim Yar Khan
Basti Shah Da Khoo Rahim Yar Khan
Basti Kombah Chachran B Rahim Yar Khan
Rahim Yar Khan
Basti Jam Abdul Gani Nazim Rahim Yar Khan
Basti Kot Rehmat Ul ah Rahim Yar Khan
Rahim Yar Khan
Rahim Yar Khan
Rahim Yar Khan
Rahim Yar Khan
Basti Khair Bakhsh Gola Rahim Yar Khan
Basti Rais Kamal Rahim Yar Khan
Muhammad Pur Quershian Basti Haji Al ah Ditta Rahim Yar Khan
Basti Pasan Wali Rahim Yar Khan
Basti Ghous Bakhsh Rahim Yar Khan
Nonu Shaheed Khas Rahim Yar Khan
Basti Faqeer Bakhsh Rongha Rahim Yar Khan
BASTI KOT SHAHBAZ Rahim Yar Khan
BASTI SHEIKH WAHAN JADID Rahim Yar Khan
DERA ALLAH DIWAYA SHAH Rahim Yar Khan
Rahim Yar Khan
Tranda Saway Khan Basti Azeem Colony Rahim Yar Khan
Tranda Saway Khan Rahim Yar Khan
Basti Masay Puria Rahim Yar Khan
Rahim Yar Khan
BASTI ALLAH ABAD Rahim Yar Khan
Rahim Yar Khan
Rahim Yar Khan
Rahim Yar Khan
Rahim Yar Khan
Basti Noor Ahmad Rahim Yar Khan
BASTI CHAK 200 TIBBA Rahim Yar Khan
Rahim Yar Khan
Rahim Yar Khan
BASTI KHOKHAR COLONY Rahim Yar Khan
Rahim Yar Khan
BASTI JAFFAR PUR Rahim Yar Khan
BASTI KACHA BHATA Rahim Yar Khan
Rahim Yar Khan
Basti Ghullam Haider Rahim Yar Khan
Basti Haji Arain Colony Rahim Yar Khan
MUHAMMAD NAWAZ WASA Rahim Yar Khan
Rahim Yar Khan
Rahim Yar Khan
Rajanpur
Rajanpur
Rajanpur
Rajanpur
Rajanpur
Rajanpur
BASTI GHULAM SARWAR Rajanpur
MUHAMMAD PUR NO. 2 BASTI GULAM HUSSAIN Rajanpur
BASTI MARAD BUKSH Rajanpur
BASTI BOPER WALA Rajanpur
BASTI ALLAH WSAYEA Rajanpur
BASTI FAIZ AHMED Rajanpur
BASTI KHADAM HUSSAIN Rajanpur
Rajanpur
Dera Jeevan Khan Basti Ghulam Ali Rajanpur
Rajanpur
BASTI ABDUL HAMID BOSAN Rajanpur
BASTI TALIB HUSSAN KAMBARNI Rajanpur
BASTI HAMZA ABAD Rajanpur
BASTI MASTER AZEEM AREN Rajanpur
Kot Mithan Katcha BASTI GOTH MITHAN KACHA Rajanpur
BASTI GHULAM NABI Rajanpur
BASTI AHMED NAJAR GOPANG Rajanpur
KOTLA MURTAZA SHAH BASTI HAZOOR BUKSH Rajanpur
KOTLA MURTAZA SHAH BASTI MONO KHAN SAJRANI Rajanpur
KOTLA SHER MUHAMMAD PACCA BASTI AHMED KHAN Rajanpur
KOTLA SHER MUHAMMAD PACCA BASTI SARWAR RASOGE Rajanpur
BASTI MUHAMMAD RAFIQ JAR Rajanpur
BASTI DUR MUHAMMAD Rajanpur
Rajanpur
Rajanpur
RAKH BANGLA DHEGAN BASTI CHUDERI LAQATE Rajanpur
RAKH BANGLA DHEGAN Rajanpur
BASTI ALLAH BACHAYA Rajanpur
Rajanpur
BASTI DATTI WALA Rajanpur
BASTI FAREED BUKSH Rajanpur
BASTI JANJOEYA COLONY Rajanpur
Basti Abdul Ghani Arain Rajanpur
Basti Hayat Sargani Rajanpur
Basti Master Ghulam Haider Rajanpur
Rajanpur
Basti Thul Naseer
APPENDIX D: RANDOM WALK SAMPLING

The random walk method described here follows the EPI Cluster Survey of the World Health Organization and UNICEF‟s Handbook „Monitoring Progress toward the Goals of the World Summit for Children‟. It includes two separate steps. The first is to choose a starting point per settlement and the second to select households to be surveyed from that point onward. Field workers should follow the following steps for selecting the starting point within each settlement: 1. Go to some central location within the settlement. This could be a market, a church, a health facility or the junction between two roads. If possible, find a local guide who can accompany you. He/she can introduce you to the families and help you find the households and the community boundaries. 2. Select a direction at random by spinning a bottle. Move in a straight line in this direction. Count all the houses you pass until you reach the edge of the settlement. If possible, number each house with chalk as you go. 3. Pick one of these numbered houses at random to form the starting point for the survey. These steps should be followed to select 10 „eligible‟ households per settlement: 1. The household nearest to the starting point should be the first to be included. 2. Spin a bottle or flip a coin to decide in which direction you should move after that. If you are uncertain about which way to move, use a random selection process to decide which household to interview (e.g. flip a coin). 3. Follow a road or a path to identify the next households to be interviewed. Instead of selecting consecutive households, always interview one household and then skip one; interview another one and skip the next; and so on. Be sure not to leave out families living away from the main roads. 4. Continue this way until you have reached 10 „eligible‟ households. I you reach the edge of the settlement before you have reached 10 „eligible‟ households, again spin a bottle or flip a coin to decide in which direction to move next. Continue until you have reached 10 „eligible‟ households. 5. If there are less than 10 „eligible‟ households in a settlement, interview all „eligible‟ households in the For each mauza and settlement, the random walk sampling should be documented according to Template 1. Template 1 District Tehsil Mauza Settlement Number of Houses Location and Edge of APPENDIX E: COLLECTING PANEL DATA

The households interviewed in the first follow-up round will be the same households that were interviewed in
the baseline round – i.e. the household surveys are envisaged as panel household surveys. To ensure high
quality and robustness of the impact evaluation of SSPP-II, it is imperative that an overwhelming proportion
of households interviewed in the baseline survey will also be interviewed in the follow-up survey. The
following six-step procedure is meant to assure this will indeed be the case.
1. Field workers are to be provided with the following information to identify panel households: Date of baseline interview, district name, tehsil name, union council name, mauza name, settlement name, house address, house GPS coordinates, name of household head, name of respondent of the baseline survey, names of other household members and mobile phone number provided in the baseline survey. With this information, field workers are to drive to the assigned settlement and use their GPS device to find the assigned household. There, they are to use the information provided to them to corroborate that they are indeed talking to the correct household. Note that the household composition might have changed since the baseline survey.12 In case of discrepancies or ambiguities, these are to be noted in writing and supervisors are to be informed. 2. As a further check as to whether field workers have approached the correct household, they are to have the household head or another adult over the age of 18 available to be interviewed verify whether the household has resided at this place since at least the date of the baseline interview. If the respondent reports that the household has resided at this place since at least the date of the baseline interview, the field workers are to commence the interview. In case no adult over the age of 18 is available to be interviewed on the initial visit, field workers are to return to the household later to ensure that it can be included in the follow-up sample. 3. If the respondent reports that the household has moved to this place since the date of the baseline interview or if there are irreconcilable discrepancies or ambiguities in the information provided to the field workers or on the ground, this is to be noted in writing, supervisors are to be informed and interview is not to be conducted.13 Rather, field workers are to use all justifiable means to identify the current location of the household that was interviewed for the baseline survey. Such means are to include but need not be limited to  Calling mobile phone numbers provided at baseline.14  Using publicly available databases.  Inquiring with dwellings‟ current residents, neighbors and other knowledgeable individuals in the respective settlement. 4. It is imperative that an overwhelming proportion of households that moved residences between the baseline and follow-up survey will be interviewed in the follow-up survey. In case such households‟ new location can be identified and their new location is inside the Province of Punjab, field workers are to travel to this new location in order to conduct follow-up interviews. 12 As a change in household composition might be a sensitive topic, it is to be approached with care and tact. 13 In case only the GPS coordinates and a household‟s address collected at baseline are at odds, an interview can still be conducted as long as sufficient information (e.g. names of household members combined with household address) all a verficiation that the respective household is indeed a panel household. 14 The survey firm is free to use the mobile phone numbers provided at baseline to contact households interviewed at baseline before field workers are being send out to conduct follow-up interviews. However, a failure to reach a household by phone or ambiguities about whether the correct household answers the phone does not release the survey firm from conducting an in-person field visit. 5. If a household‟s new location can absolutely not be identified or it is determined that it lies outside the Province of Punjab or if the household does not consent in conducting a follow-up interview, the random-walk procedure described in Appendix D is to be used to draw a replacement household in the same settlement as the one where the household was initially located. 6. Supervisors are not to provide CNIC numbers recorded as part of the baseline data collection to field workers. Instead, supervisors are to check whether CNIC numbers recorded as part of the follow-up survey are consistent with those on file. In case of any disparities these are to be noted in writing and supervisors are to make inquiries regarding whether inconsistencies can be explained. If yes, these explanations are again to be noted in writing. If not, field workers are to return to the respective settlement and identify the correct household so that it can be included in the follow-up sample.

Source: http://www.pesrp.edu.pk/downloads/tor/TORs_of_SSPP2_Follow_up_Survey_for_IE_%2014_15.pdf

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****Published February 2015*** MarketVIEW: Cholesterol (PCSK9) vaccines (CAT: VAMV045) Product Name MarketVIEW: Cholesterol (PCSK9) vaccines Description Global vaccine commercial opportunity assessment Contents Executive presentation + 1 forecast model Therapeutic Area Publication date