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Microsoft word - annual report 2007 final 1 _repaired_

Executive Summary This report contains information on the objectives, accomplishments, constraints and activities of the Pesticides and Toxic Chemicals Control Board for 2007. The proposed achievements for 2008 are also included. An organisational chart was developed proposing four divisions with total staffing of twenty-three persons headed by the Registrar. The Board is currently staffed with nine persons. The Pesticides and Toxic Chemicals Control (Amendment) Act 2007 was passed allowing Guyana to accede to the Rotterdam Convention in August 2007. The Board was named as the focal point and satisfied all obligations required under the Convention. The Pesticides and Toxic Chemicals Control (Amendment) Regulations 2007 was signed into law in March allowing the Board to commence charging fees for the administration of pesticides and toxic chemicals in Guyana from the 1st April 2007. The fees collected for 2007 was approximately $13 M and the Board's activities continue to be subvented by the Government of Guyana. It is estimated that the Board shall be self sustainable by 2011. The Board's proposed budget for 2008 reflects an expenditure of $ 41 M and provides for the establishment and functioning of the pesticide laboratory in 2008. The Auditor General's Office completed their examination of the Board's financial statement for 2006 and validated that the financial statements were in conformity with generally accepted accounting practice. No chemical was added to the list of prohibited chemicals established in 2006. A total of thirty-two entities made registration submissions for two hundred and fifty-four pesticides comprising one hundred and twenty-three insecticides, seventy-four herbicides, thirty-five fungicides, thirteen rodenticides and nine others. Two hundred chemicals by trade names were imported for the year by thirty-two importers. Total imports for the year was approximately $ 616 M which reflected a 43% drop in import compared to 2006 and the overall importation is significantly lower than 2004 and 2005. There were ninety-two vending premises certified for the year. Inspectors of the Board and Enforcement Officers of the Guyana Revenue Authority (GRA) inspected three premises in Georgetown and seized a large quantity of illegal mosquito coils and aerosol insecticides. Most of the equipment for the pesticides laboratory was received with the notable exception being the Gas Chromatograph. All the equipment was housed in the laboratory building and covered the requirement for qualitative analysis. The Board intends to further expand its capability in 2008 by procuring through the Agricultural Diversification Programme equipment for residual analysis. The Board was represented at a number of national meetings on matters concerning pesticides and toxic chemicals management. Regionally, the Board was represented at a seminar on the sound management of chemicals in the Caribbean in St. Lucia and internationally, the Registrar participated in a training programme, "Crop Diseases and Pest Control Training Course 2007 for developing countries hosted by China International Centre for Agricultural Training (CICAT). Public Awareness activities by the Board included participation in a number of exhibitions across Guyana. A website address was registered and construction commenced and the site should be operational in 2008. A training manual for farmers and farm workers entitled "Bains and Boodhoo" was developed and launched during agriculture month. An agricultural database for chemicals registered by the Board was constructed with financial support from the Pan- American Health Organisation (PAHO). The Board intends to continue its public awareness activities in 2008 with the observation of Pesticides Awareness Day, Week and Month along with participation in national agricultural activities. The Board provided training to farmers and participated in the Farmers Field School activities coordinated by the Guyana Rice Development Board (GRDB) at a number of locations in Regions 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6, and intends to continue training in these areas in 2008. Other proposed training activities include development of another manual and other associated training material along with the inputting of information in the database for distribution to vendors, schools and extension Introduction . 1 Administration . 1 Board of Directors . 2 Signatories of the Board . 2 Responsibility of the Board . 3 Objectives of the Board . 3 Review 2007: . 4 Pesticides Registration . 4 Pesticide Laboratory . 6 Meetings & Training . 7 Pesticides Importation . 9 Agricultural Diversification Program . 12 Vending of Pesticides and Toxic Chemicals . 13 Training Manual . 13 Accounts 2006 . 13 Expenditure & Accounts 2007 . 14 Budget 2008 . 14 Public Awareness . 15 Website Development . 15 Agricultural Database . 15 Prohibited Pesticides . 16 Experimental Pesticides . 16 Sectoral Coordination . 16 Enforcement . 16 Organisational Chart . 17 Industrial Development . 17 Regulatory Developments . 17 International Development . 18 Proposal 2008 . 19 Key Issues and Challenges . 20 Future Plans: 2008 Onwards . 20 APPENDIX I: List of Pesticides submitted for Registrationr . 21 APPENDIX II: List of Approved Equipment and Supplies for the Pesticide Laboratory . 28 APPENDIX III: Pesticides Board Imported Chemicals (2007) - Trade Names . 33 APPENDIX IV: List of Importers . 36 APPENDIX V: Total Imports of Pesticides by Common Names and Value 2007 . 37 APPENDIX VI: Licensed Vending Premises . 39 APPENDIX VII: Pesticides and Toxic Chemicals Control Board Statement of Income and Expenditure for the Year Ended December 31st 2006 . 43 APPENDIX VIII: Pesticides and Toxic Chemicals Control Board Accounts for Period Ending December 31, 2007 . 44 APPENDIX IX: Pesticides And Toxic Chemicals Control Board . 45 APPENDIX X: List of chemicals prohibited in Guyana . 47 Appendix XI: Organisational & Personnel Chart for the Pesticides and Toxic Chemicals Control Board . 48 APPENDIX XII: Pesticides and Toxic Chemicals Control (Amendment) Act 2007 . 49 APPENDIX XIII: Pesticides and Toxic Chemicals Regulations . 53 APPENDIX XIV: Skeldon Report . 60 APPENDIX XV: China Report . 75 APPENDIX XVI: St. Lucia Report . 84 Table 1: Pesticides and Respective Value by Category . 9 Figure 1: Constitution of Chemical Imports . 9 Figure 2: Trend in Chemical Imports for Past Five Years . 9 Figure 3: Insecticides Imported for the Period 2004-2007 . 10 Figure 4: Herbicides Imported for the Period 2004-2007 . 10 Figure 5: Fungicides Imported for the Period 2004-2007 . 11 Figure 6: Rodenticides Imported for the Period 2004-2007 . 12 Figure 7: Launching Ceremony of the Pesticides Manual . 13 Figure 8: Public Awareness Display Booth . 15 This Report chronicles the Board's activities for the year 2007. It highlights the accomplishments and discusses constraints of the Pesticides and Toxic Chemicals Control Board objectives and activities initiated for the year 2007. The Report also encompasses the Board's objectives and proposed achievements 1.1 Administration The staffing establishments for the Board were as follows: Basudeo Dwarka, Registrar, Pesticides and Toxic Chemicals; Usha Homenauth, Administrative Secretary; Trecia David, Inspector, Licensing and Registration; Vivek Joshi, Inspector, Inspection and Enforcement; Suresh Amichand, Inspector, Training and Enforcement - employed in Lucina Singh, Inspector; re-designated as Assistant Analyst; Moonmattie Singh, Accountant; (viii) Ann Mohamed, Office Assistant / Data Input Clerk resigned August 2007 Shivannaha Persaud - Office Assistant / Data Input Clerk, employed in October 2007; and Lolita Abrams, Cleaner /Charwoman. The Board hired a new Inspector, Mr. Suresh Amichand to replace Ms. Lucina Singh who was re-designated as Assistant Analyst to better utilize her training - Masters in Biology with specialization in Chemical and Environmental Toxicology - received in the Pesticide and Toxic Chemicals Laboratory. The vacancy for Inspector was publicly advertised and there were eight applicants. The top ranked candidate was Mr. Amichand. The Office Assistant / Data Input Clerk, Ms. Ann Mohamed, resigned her position with the Board because she was migrating and was replaced with Ms. Shivannaha Persaud. Annual Report 2007 1.2 Board of Directors The Directorate of the Board appointed for 2006 continued until June 2007. A new Board was appointed from the 1st August 2007 and was appointed to serve until the 31st December 2008. The members of the Board are as follows: Dr. Leslie Munroe – Chairman; Mr. Ramesh Lilwah – Deputy Chairman - Representative Environmental Protection Agency; Resigned November 2007; Ms.Karen Alleyne - Representative of the Environmental Protection Agency; replaced Mr. Lilwah; Mr. Kuldip Ragnauth – Deputy Chairman and Ex Officio Member; Dr. Dindyal Permaul – Representative of the Ministry of Agriculture; Dr. Rudolph Cummings – Representative of the Ministry of Health; Resigned June 2007; Dr. Shamdeo Persaud – Representative of the Ministry of Health; replaced Dr. Cummings; Dr. Dalgleish Joseph – Member; Dr. Harold Davis – Member; and Mr. Khame Sharma – Member. Mr. Basudeo Dwarka, the Registrar of Pesticides and Toxic Chemicals functioned as Secretary of the Board as required by the Pesticides and Toxic Chemicals Control Act (No. 13 of 2000). Statutory meetings of the Board were held on the third Wednesday of every month and as required for technical meetings. There were no technical meetings during the period under review. There were eight statutory meetings for the year and the attendance by Directors at the meetings had been excellent throughout the year. 1.4 Signatories of the Board Annual Report 2007 The signatories of the Board for the year under review were: Chairman of the Board – Dr. Leslie Munroe; Secretary of the Board – Mr. Basudeo Dwarka; Deputy Chairman – Mr. Ramesh Lilwah, who resigned in November and was replaced with Mr. Kuldip Ragnauth; and Dr. Dindyal Permaul. The order of signatories of the Board remains the same – Chairman and/or Secretary with any other director. Following the resignation of Mr. Lilwah from the Board, Mr. Ragnauth was subsequently appointed Deputy Chairman. 1.5 Responsibility of the Board The Board is charged with the responsibility for making arrangements and providing facilities for controlling the manufacturing, importing, transporting, storing, selling, using and advertising of pesticides and toxic chemicals. 1.6 Objectives of the Board The foremost objective of the Board is to introduce a national pesticide and toxic chemical control scheme. In this respect consideration is given to the current and future ability of the country to operate the scheme with respect to the legal framework and the degree of support that the Government of Guyana is able to It is also the Board's objective to develop criteria and protocols that are effective and workable to achieve goals with the minimum dislocation of production or trade and to collaborate with the various stakeholders and other individuals to achieve The objectives of the Board for the year under review were as follows: Establishment of a pesticides laboratory; Annual Report 2007 Publishing a list of chemicals prohibited in Guyana; Publishing a list of chemicals registered for use in Guyana; Licensing of vendors of agrochemicals and toxic chemicals; Training and certifying pesticides control operators; and Continued implementation of the Regulations. 2 The Pesticides and Toxic Chemicals Control Board's Achievements for the period under review were as follow: 2.1 Pesticides Registration The Board received applications requesting registration of two hundred and fifty- four (254) pesticides from a total of thirty two (32) entities. These were made up of one hundred and twenty-three (123) insecticides, seventy-four (74) herbicides, four (4) plant growth regulators, thirteen (13) rodenticides, four (4) biological insecticides, thirty-five (35) fungicides and one (1) fumigant. The following is a summary of the registration requested: registration requested of seventeen products; request made for three products; request made for the registration of one product; Insecticidas Internationales eleven products; F.C.T. Technologies (Americas) Inc registration for thirty five products. Atul Limited - request made for the registration of one product; request made for the registration of one product; - request made for the registration of one product; Bayer Crop Science - request made for the registration of one Annual Report 2007 S.C Johnson & Sons Inc - request made for the registration of twenty four products; Agro Care Chemical Industry Group Limited made for the registration of sixteen products; Guangzhou Hesenta Chemicals Co, Ltd request made for the registration of four products; Katwaroo Maniram - request made for the registration of eighteen Marketing Arm International registration of twelve products; Caribbean Chemicals & Agencies Ltd - request made for the registration of forty-nine products; Research & Development Rentokil Initial PLC made for the registration of four products; request made for the registration of two - request made for the registration of one Roma Manufacturing Company Limited request made for the registration of two products; Shanghai Agrochina International Trade Cooperation limited - request made for the registration of sixteen products; Dupont de Colombia request made for the registration of request made for the registration of one Mc Bride Caribbean Limited registration of four products; Sulphur Mills Limited - request made for the registration of two request made for the registration of two product; Annual Report 2007 Sinochem Ningbo Ltd request made for the registration of Ivorychem PTE Ltd - request made for the registration of four (bb) Nanjing Chivalry Chemicals Limited – request made for the registration of thirty-five chemicals; Drexel Chemicals Company – request made for the registration of ten (dd) FCT Technologies – request made for the registration of two chemicals; Excel Ag Corp – request made for the registration of one chemical; Excel Ag. / Huntington request made for the registration of three products; and - request made for the registration of one The list of the chemicals received by the Board to date along with the companies seeking their registration is shown as (Appendix I). 2.2 Pesticide Laboratory The laboratory building was completed in December 2006 at a final cost of seventeen million, five hundred and eighty-eight thousand dollars ($ 17,588,000.00). The list of equipment and supplies for the laboratory was approved by the Inter- American Development Bank. This was tendered and was awarded to the following Western Scientific Company Limited – US $ 242,249.61; and Scientific Supplies and Technology International Inc, - US 15,000.37. The list of equipment and supplies are shown as (APPENDIX II). All of the equipment and supplies was received with the exception of the Gas Chromatograph (GC). The Annual Report 2007 suppliers are expected to provide installation, training and familiarization on all the 2.3 Meetings & Training 2.3.1 Meetings The Board was represented by Ms. Trecia David, Inspector, Registration and Training, at a meeting of the National Committee on Conformity Assessment (NCCA) of the Guyana National Bureau of Standards (GNBS). The meeting examined standards management, conformity assessment activities, metrology, information dissemination, training and metrication. The Pesticides and Toxic Chemicals Control Board was represented by Lucina Singh at National Capacity of Assessment Workshop held on the 22nd March 2007. The purpose of the workshop was to examine the recommended actions proposed in Draft 1 of the Guyana Strategy and Action Plan for Synergistic Environmental Capacity Development in Relation to the Thematic Areas of Biodiversity, Climate Change and Land The Pesticides and Toxic Chemicals Control Board was represented by Mr. Vivek Joshi and the Registrar at two meetings in East Berbice. The meetings were to discuss agricultural matters. One of the discussions was the illegal use of chemicals from Surinam. The farmers were of the belief that the Board is stopping the importation from Surinam. The Registrar informed the meeting that all pesticides must be registered in Guyana and the importers are failing to supply the required registration documents after two and a half years leading to the refusal of license for importation. The Board was represented by Inspectors also at the following meeting: National Committee on Conformity Assessment; Public Sector Management Modernisation Meeting - which examined the matrix of the programme such as missions and visions; financial management and human resource management; Annual Report 2007 Malaria Committee – which examined the malaria situation in Guyana and the options available for the control of the vector and the disease; Heads of Department Meeting – an examination of the progress and status of the agricultural sector; and Sanitary and Phytosanitary Meeting to review the functions of the Committee. The Pesticides Board was represented at a seminar on the sound management of chemicals in the Caribbean in St.Lucia by Ms Trecia David. The report submitted for this seminar is shown as (Appendix XVI). The Board provided training to farmers at a number of locations throughout the country. The Farmers Field School (FFS) held by the Guyana Rice Development Board (GRDB) made available one day in their programme for discussions on the use and management of pesticides. These were held in Region 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6. The Board jointly had training sessions with the National Agricultural Research Institute (NARI) at Gordon's Table, Mahaicony River and Parika Backdam. The Board also provided general training to farmers from Bath Settlement on the use and management of pesticides. This meeting was well attended and received intense participation by the farmers in attendance numbering over fifty. The Board also provided baits and training on the methods of baiting for rats at Little Biaboo, Mahaicony. The training also covered the types of baits and the advantages and disadvantages of each type. The Registrar participated in a training programme, "Crop Diseases and Pest Control Training Course 2007 for developing countries hosted by China International Centre for Agricultural Training (CICAT). The duration of the programme was seven weeks and was held in Guangzhou, China. The Final report of the Course is shown as (Appendix Annual Report 2007 2.4 Pesticides Importation The list of chemicals imported for the year in review is shown as (Appendix III). There were two hundred chemicals by Pesticide Category Trade Names imported for the year (Appendix IV). The total imports for the year was approximately six Table 1: Pesticides and Respective Value by Category hundred and sixteen million dollars. The largest category of chemical To x ic Ch e m ic a ls
imported for the year was herbicides, Ro d e n tic id e s
F u n g ic id e
accounting for three hundred and ten In s e c tic id e s
million dollars ($ 310 M) or fifty percent (50%) of the total imports. This was followed by insecticides, He rb ic id e s
with two hundred and thirty-two ($ Figure 1: Constitution of Chemical Imports 232 M) or thirty-eight percent (38%), toxic chemicals six percent (6%), rodenticides five percent (5%) and fungicides, one There was a forty-three percent drop in value of importation for the year in comparison with total importation for 2006 and the Imports 2003 - 2007 overall importation is lower than 2005 and 2004. The decrease is uniform for all the categories of chemicals. For the year under review there were twenty- imported with allethrin being the Figure 2: Trend in Chemical Imports for Past Five highest value insecticide followed by Annual Report 2007 cyfluthrin, monocrotophos and imidacloprid. The top two importations under this category are used for the control of household insects while the next two are use for the control of field insects especially padi bugs (O. Poecilus) in rice. The comparisons of importations for the previous four years are similar. There was no new category of importation for the year. Insecticides Imported for the Period 2004 - 2007
Acephate (l)Acetamiprid (l)Allethrin (l)Alpha Cypermethrin (l) Aluminium PhosphideAzadiracthin (l)B. Thuringiensis (kg) B-Cyfluthrin (l)Carbaryl (kg)Cartap (kg) Chlorfenapyr (l)Chlorfenvinphos (l)Chloropyrifos (l) Cypermethrin (l)Cypermethrin Profenofos (l)Cyromazine (kg) Deltamethrin (l)Diafenthuiron (l) Dimethoate (l)Enamectin (l) Fenpropathrin (l) Imidiacloprid (kg)Imiprothrin (l)Lambda Cyhalothrin (l) Malathion (l)Methamidophos (l) Methomyl (l)Monocrotophos (l)Newmectin Oleic Acid (l)Oxamyl (l)Phosphine PropoxurPiperonyl Butoxide (kg)Pynaying D'Allethrin (l) Pyrimiphos-methyl (l)Thiamethoxam (kg) TryclamTriazophos (l) Figure 3: Insecticides Imported for the Period 2004-2007 Herbicides which accounted for fifty percent of the total imports for the year was Herbicides Imported for the Period 2004 - 2007
Bispyribae Sodium (l) Diquat dibromide (l) Fluazifop-p-butyl (l) Isoxaflutole (kg) Paraquat Dichloride (l) Propaquizafop (l) S-Metholachlor (l) Annual Report 2007 Figure 4: Herbicides Imported for the Period 2004-2007 headed by the broad leaf systemic herbicide 2, 4-D Amine with approximately sixty million ($ 60 M) dollars followed by paraquat with forty-eight million ($ 48 M), terbutryn with forty-seven million ($ 47 M) and glyphosate with forty-six million ($ 46 M). Overall importation covered twenty-one categories. There was no new category imported for the year in review. Fungicides Imported for the Period 2004 - 2007
Azoxystrobin (kg) Chlorothalonil (l) Copper Hydroxide (kg) Dimethomorph (kg) Fentin Acetate (kg) Pyraclostrobin (kg) Thiophanate-methyl (kg) Figure 5: Fungicides Imported for the Period 2004-2007 The total import of fungicides for the year was approximately six million (6 M) for fifteen (15) categories with azoxystrobin the largest followed by carbendazim. Both were just over one million ($ 1 M). The largest chemical imported in the previous year, 2006, fentin acetate, was not imported for the year under review. This product is chiefly used for the control of snails in the rice industry. Annual Report 2007 Rodenticides Imported for the Period 2004 - 2007
Bromadiolone (kg) Figure 6: Rodenticides Imported for the Period 2004-2007 The total import of rodenticide for the year was approximately thirty million ($ 30 M) in two categories, floucomafen and brodifacoum. The largest user of rodenticide in Guyana is GuySuCo. Imports for the year under review, classified as Toxic Chemicals are made up mostly of products such as disinfectants, chlorine used for the production of bleaches and mineral and white spirits used for paint production. 2.5 Agricultural Diversification Program The Board contributed and participated in the preparation of the program and budget of the Agricultural Diversification Program as required by the Ministry of Agriculture and the Inter American Development Bank. The Board's submission was for the requirement of the Pesticides and Toxic Chemicals Laboratory Phase II and contained the equipment for residual analysis. The two equipment proposed are a Gas Chromatograph (GC) and High Performance Liquid Chromatograph (HPLC). Annual Report 2007


2.6 Vending of Pesticides and Toxic Chemicals The Board certified ninety two vending premises for the year. The list of vendors is shown as (Appendix VI). There was no seizure for the year since vendors was given a grace period of up until 31st December 2007 to have all illegal and unlicensed chemicals removed from vending sites. At the end of the year all products that would be offered for sale must be properly 2.7 Training Manual A training programme was developed for the training of farmers, farm workers and vendors under the theme "Management and Production". This programme commenced in Figure 7: Launching Ceremony of the 2007 and is ongoing. As required in the Pesticides Manual
programme a training manual for farmers and farm workers entitled "Bains and
Boodhoo" was developed and launched in October. The manual was developed in a cartooned form to facilitate easy understanding. Mr. Barrington Braithwaite was contracted by the Board to provide the art work for the manual. The Guyana Rice Project Management Unit provided financial support for the printing of this manual 2.8 Accounts 2006 The Auditor General's Office completed their examination of the Board's financial statement for 2006 as required under Section 41 of the Pesticides and Toxic Chemicals Control Act and the Financial Management Act and validated that the financial statements present fairly, in all materials respects, the financial position of the Board as at 31 December 2006 and its deficit for the year then ended, in conformity with generally accepted accounting practice. Annual Report 2007 The audited expenditure for the Board for 2006 was twenty three million, four hundred and fifty eight thousand, eight hundred and fifty nine dollars ($ 23,458,859.00) 2.9 Expenditure & Accounts 2007 The Board's proposed budget for 2007 was sixteen million, seven hundred and sixty thousand dollars (Appendix IX). The unqualified account for the year under review is shown as (Appendix VIII). The accounts reflect an expenditure of twenty- nine million, eight hundred and forty nine thousand, and eight hundred and twenty five dollars ($ 29,849,825.00). The accounts represent an over expenditure of thirteen million and eighty nine thousand eight hundred and twenty five dollars ($ 13,089,825.00). This over expenditure was mainly due to the employment of an Accountant and an Assistant Analyst coupled with the retroactive payment for the nine percent wages increase in 2007, rental and maintenance of building ($ 3,451,030.00) and utility charges ($2,365,640.00). The major expenditure for the period under review was salaries and wages followed by office building maintenance and meetings and other events which include the cost for inspection of premises, training and awareness. In a move towards self sustainability, the Board implemented charges in the form of administrative fee on all imports from the 1st April 2007. This fee is charged on all imports covered by the Board and is calculated at three percent of Coast Insurance and Freight of the chemicals. The fees collected for the year in review was thirteen million, nine hundred and seven thousand, one hundred and ninety nine dollars ($13,907,199.00). 2.10 Budget 2008 The Proposed budget for the Board for 2008 reflects a total expenditure of forty one million, two hundred and seventy seven thousand, two hundred and forty dollars ($ Annual Report 2007



41,277,240.00). (Appendix IX). This increase in cost is for the establishment and functioning of the pesticide laboratory in 2008. 2.11 Public Awareness The Board participated in GuyExPo 2007 from 27th September – 2nd October 2007 under the theme "Increasing the Competitiveness of participated in Agricultural Month activities in Figure 8: Public Awareness Display Booth October in Georgetown, Linden, Essequibo, and Berbice. The Board also participated in West Demerara Nite at the Uitvlugt Community Center Ground and Guyana Nite at the Providence Stadium. 2.12 Website Development The Board has registered the website's address http://ptccb.org.gy. The development of the website has commenced and it will be operational in 2008. The website construction was awarded to GuyEnterprise Limited, who was also responsible for hosting the site. After Figure 9: Outline of the Board's Proposed some problems with GuyEnterprise, the Board Webpage contracted Mr. Clarrence Garraway from Resonant Technologies, to complete the website. The website should be up and operational early 2008. 2.13 Agricultural Database Annual Report 2007 The Board agreed on the development of an agricultural database and the advertisement inviting individuals to construct the database was placed in the media. The closing date for the receipt of application was the 27th November 2006. The database will contain the chemicals registered by the Board, the pests and the crops. The database is anticipated for use by farmers, vendors, students, extension agents and scientists. The Board also approached the Pan American Health Organisation (PAHO), who agreed to fund the development of the database. PAHO contracted Resonant Technologies to develop the database. The database has been completed and information will be inputted in 2008. The database would also be accessed through the Board's website. 2.14 Prohibited Pesticides The Order for the declaration of the list of prohibited chemicals was signed by the Minister of Agriculture and Gazetted on the 18th November 2006. There are no chemicals currently used in Guyana listed as prohibited. No chemical was added to the list in 2007. The list of chemicals is shown as (Appendix X). 2.15 Experimental Pesticides No new pesticide was declared to the Board for experimental purposes during the year 2.16 Sectoral Coordination The Directors of the Board agreed that any committee formed under the Board will be task oriented, established on an ad hoc basis and will report directly to the Board. No committee was convened for the year in review. 2.17 Enforcement Inspectors of the Pesticides and Toxic Chemicals Control Board and Enforcement Officers of the Guyana Revenue Authority inspected three premises in Georgetown: Annual Report 2007 Najab Trading, Bacchus Trading and A. Wahab Imports. This led to a the seizure of the following items: 169 cases of Goldeer Insect Killer, 42 cases LIZI PAI Mosquito Coils, 33 cases Lion Brand Mosquito Coils and 10 bottles of Raid Aerosol. The Board chose not to prosecute since this was a first offence; however, warning letters were issued to each of the owners in keeping with the Pesticides and Toxic Chemicals 2.18 Organisational Chart The Organisational Chart of the Pesticides and Toxic Chemicals Control Board was developed and shown as (Appendix XI). The organization of the Board contains four divisions: Licensing and Registration, Enforcement and Training, Administration and Analytical. Each division will be headed by senior personnel. The total staff under the Board will be twenty-three (23) persons headed by the Registrar. 2.19 Industrial Development The Guyana Sugar Corporation has introduced a new requirement in keeping with the requirements of the Pesticides and Toxic Chemicals Control Regulation 2000 (No. 8 of 2000) whereby all suppliers of pesticides to the corporation must provide a letter from the Board stating that the pesticide supplied to the corporation is registered or approved for use in Guyana. Approving and issuing of contract by the corporation is based on the submission of this letter. 2.20 Regulatory Developments The Pesticides and Toxic Chemicals Control (Amendment) Act 2007 (No. 13 of 2007) was assented to by the President of the Republic of Guyana on the 23rd March 2007 is shown as (Appendix XII). These amendments to the Act facilitated the Board's control of exports of pesticides and toxic chemicals. This was a pre-requisite for Guyana's accession to the Rotterdam Convention. Annual Report 2007 The Pesticides and Toxic Chemicals Control (Amendment) Regulations 2007 (No. 5 of 2007) was made by the Honourable Minister of Agriculture on the 13th of March 2007 and is shown as (Appendix XIII). This allowed the Board to commence charging fees which was established at 3% of the Cost Insurance and Freight of all pesticides and toxic chemicals imported into Guyana. This fee is used for the improvement of the inspectorate in inspection and enforcement and for the better management of pesticides and toxic chemicals in Guyana. It was estimated that this fee would allow the Board activities to be sustainable in five years time. 2.21 International Development The Amendment to the Pesticides and Toxic Chemicals Act allowed Guyana to accede to the Rotterdam Convention in August 2007. Guyana also fulfilled all of its obligations under the Convention. Response for all the chemicals listed by the Convention was provided in September 2007. The focal point for the Convention is the Pesticides and Toxic Chemical Control Board with the Designated National Authority (DNA), the Registrar, Pesticides and Toxic Chemicals. The Government also named the Board as the focal point for the Strategic Approach for International Chemical Management (SAICM). The Government of Guyana is funding the current activities of the Board through subvention as reflected in the annual accounts. The Board's move towards sustainability commenced during the year in review. The Board commenced charging fees for the administration of pesticides and toxic chemicals in Guyana on the 1st April 2007. It is estimated that the Board shall be fully self sustainable Annual Report 2007 2.23 Proposal 2008 The proposed activities for the Board for 2008 include the following: Completion of the Website (February 2008); Observance of Pesticides Awareness Week in September 2008; and Printing and distribution of Quarterly Pesticides Newsletter. Procurement of Equipment for the Laboratory (Phase II) (October 2008); Installation of Equipment (April 2008); Training on the major Laboratory Equipment (Gas Chromatograph-Mass Spectrometer) (April 2008); Commence quality evaluation of pesticides imported in Guyana (May 2008); Develop timeframe and audit of vending facilities to facilitate selling off of all pesticides not proposed for registration (August 2008); List of pesticides approved for use in Guyana published (April 2008); and Evaluation of 75 pesticides registered for quality in Guyana (November 2008). Printing of Training Manual and other associated training material; Completion of Database structure and testing of database (May 2008) (xiii) Insert data in database and distribution to vendors, schools and extension agents Annual Report 2007 Commencing training of farmers in Region 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 in conjunction with GRDB and FFS. Proposed to train approximately 100 farmers per region (Training to commence in April 2008 with completion by November 2008 2.24 Key Issues and Challenges The key issue facing the Board continues to be the implementation of the Pesticides and Toxic Chemicals Regulations with the key challenge being monitoring of the regulations throughout Guyana. The Ministry of Agriculture would continue to fund the Board's activities through subvention currently and in the near future. 3 Future Plans: 2008 Onwards The Board future remains in establishing a comprehensive registration scheme and being able to provide the necessary infrastructure required for the establishment of appropriate educational, advisory, health-care and extension services for enabling and exercising adequate control over quality, sale and usage of pesticides. The establishment of the Pesticide Laboratory would enhance the Board's monitoring and enforcement capabilities. In conclusion, the Board's objectives, achievements and proposed activities should be seen as an attempt to establish a comprehensive registration scheme and to provide the necessary infrastructures required for the establishment of appropriate educational, advisory, health-care and extension services for enabling and exercising adequate control over quality, sale and usage of pesticides while ensuring that the interest of end-users and importers' rights are well protected. Annual Report 2007 APPENDIX I: List of Pesticides submitted for Registration along with Applicant and Manufacturer Registration Document Submitted Agro-Care Chemical Industry Caribbean Chemicals Guyana 2, 4 D Amine Salts 72% Imidiacloprid 70% Chlorpyrifos 48% Imidiacloprid 24% Lambda Cyhalothrin 5% Aluminium Phosphide 57% Alpha Cypermethrin 5% Metamidophos 600g/l Monocrotophos 400g/l, 500g/l, 600g/l Atul Limited, Agrochemicals Caribbean Chemicals Ltd 2,4 D Dimethyl Amine Salt Insecticidas Internatcionales Associated Industries Limited Inimectin (Avermectin) Danol 60E (Diazinon) Thionil 35-E (Endosulfan) Batazo 80PM (Diuron) Amidor (Metamidophos) Inithion 57 (Malathion) Cyper 25 (Cypermethrin) Torpedo 350CE (Cypermethrin & Inisan 60 (Monocrotophos) Aminex 720 (2,4 D) Associated Industries Limited Alpha Cypermethrin 5EC Associated Industries Limited Agree 50WP (B. Thuringiensis) Associated Industries Limited Associated Industries Limited Glifosan LS (Glyphosate) Annual Report 2007 S.C Johnson & Son, Inc. Associated Industries Limited Raid House & Garden Bug Killer Formula 7 Raid Concentration Deep Reach Fogger Raid with Germfighter Ant & Roach Killer Raid Flea Killer Raid Yard Guard Outdoor Fogger Formula Raid Outdoor Ant & Roach Killer Raid Ant & Roach Killer Raid Flying Insect Killer Formula 6 Raid Earth Options Ant & Roach Killer Raid Earth Options Flying Insect Killer Raid Earth Options Wasp & Hornet Killer Raid Outdoor Ant Spikes Off! Deep Woods Insect Repellant V Off! Skintastic IV Off! Skintastic VIII Off! Skintastic VII Off! Power Pad Lamp Off! Skintastic X Insect Repellant Off! Active Insect Repellant I Off! Active Insect Repellant IV Off! Deep Woods Insect Repellant Off! Deep Woods Sportsmen Insect Off! Deep Woods Sportsmen Insect Bayer Crop Science Associated Industries Limited Trading & Distribution / Klerat Wax Blocks Annual Report 2007 Dual Gold 960 EC Nanjing Chivalry Chemical. Co FCT Technologies (Guyana) Imidacloprid 70% WS Imidacloprid 35% SC Brodifacoum 0.005% Terbutryn 500g/l FW S-Metolachlor 960g/l Ec Brodifacoum 0.005% Wax Blocks Glyphosate 41% SL 2,4 D Amine 720g/l SL Bispyribac-Sodium 10% SC Fentin Acetate 60% Wp Brodifacoum 0.005% Pellets Hexaconazole 40g/l SC Metalaxy + Mancozeb 72% WP Ethephon 480g/l SL Paraquat Dichloride 24% SL Abamectin 1.8% EC Fenitrothion 50% EC Metsulfuron-Methyl 60% WDG Lambda-Cyhalothrin 5% EC Monocrotophos 60% WSC Carbemdazim 500g/l SC Cypermethrin 40% EC Drexel Chemical FCT Technologies Ametryn plus Atrazine 500 Terbutryn 500 SC Glyphosate 480 EC Dimethoate 40 EC Methamidophos 60% EC Guangzhou Hesenta Chemicals Agri Quality Inc. Paraquat Dichloride 240g/l SL 2,4 D Amine salts 720g/l SL Imidiacloprid 70%WP Katwaroo Maniram Annual Report 2007 Pyribaden 20% EC Malathion 57% EC Fusirore (Fenoxprop-p-ethyl) 2,4 D Amine Salts 720g/l SL Super-Maxzone (Paraquat 20% SL) Glyphosate 41% SL Aluminium Phosphide Admajor (Imidiacloprid 20% SL) Niclosamide 83% WP Isoprothiolane 40% EC Chlorpyrifos 20%EC Lambda Cyhalothrin 2.5 % EC Bestac 10% EC (Alpha Cypermethrin) Kristan 60% WP (Fentin Acetate) Metsulfuron Methyl 60% WDG Marketing Arm International Marketing Arm International IsoProMap 40Ec (Fungicide) Mapclorax 25Sc (Herbicide) Agro IBA 98SP (Plant Growth Regulator) New Cyper-M 10EC Newmectin 1.8EC (Insecticide) Biolife 20SL (Fungicide) Tryclam 50SP (Insecticide) Bio Neem OL (Insecticide) Phyton 27 Bactericide-Fungicide Caribbean Chemicals & Agencies Caribbean Chemicals Guyana Control Flowable 500gr Rogor Blue 40% Ec Carbendazim 50% Sc Malathion 96% ULV Annual Report 2007 Chloropyrifos 48% Ec Fastac 5% W/V Ec Diafenthiuron 50 Ec Research & Development Rentokil Initail Guyana Fentrol Concentrate Rentokil Initial PLC Bromatrol Concentrate Rentokil Initail Guyana Final Rodenticide Trading & Distribution Roma Manufacturing Company Roma Manufacturing Company Fish Brand Vapour Mats Fish Mosquito Coils Shanghai Agrochina International Mr. Sheik Sattaur Abamectin 1.8% EC Trade Cooperation Limited 2, 4 D Amine 720g/l SL 2, 4 D Amine 860g/l SL Annual Report 2007 Alpha Cypermethrin Quizalofop-p-ethyl EC 5% Cypermethrin 25% EC Fenoxaprop-p-ethyl 7.5% EW Lambda Cyhalothrin 2.5% EC Fentin Acetate 60% WP Lambda Cyhalothrin 5% EC Byspyribac Sodium 25% WP Paraquate 27.6% SL Imidiacloprid 70% WDG Imidiacloprid 20% SL Glyphosate 480g/l SL Imidiacloprid 20% SC Dupont de Colombia Caribbean Chemicals Guyana Vydate L(Oxamyl 24%) Velpar DF (Hexazinone 75%) Lannate L(Methomyl 24%) Karmex DF(Diuron 80%) Manzate 75DF (Mancozeb 75%) Kocide 101(Hidroxido de Cobre 77%) Velpar DF(Hexazinone 25%) Lannate L(Methomyl 29%) Patsan Trading Services Patsan Trading Services McBride Caribbean Limied Pharmagen Enterprises Go!! Insect Repellant Citronella BOP Insect Spray Evergreen BOP Insect Spray BOP Insecticide Spray Sulphur Mills Ltd Imidiacloprid 35Sc Imidiacloprid 70WG Trading &Distribution Det Aerosol (permethrin) Caribbean Chemicals Ltd. Sinochem Ningbo Ltd Flazifop-p-butyl 150g/l Ec Paraquat Dichloride 276g/l SL 2,4 D Amine 720g/l SL Sinochem Ningbo Ltd Imidiacloprid 70%WG Ivorychem PTE Ltd Viking 48Sc - Glyphosate 480g/l Plunge 85Wp - Carbaryl 85% Wp Zantan 72Sl - 2,4 D Amine Raze 20Sl - Paraquat 276g/l Excel Ag. / Huntington Aval - Acetamiprid FCT Technologies Fct Technologies Inc. Brodifacoum 0.005% Wax Blocks Flocoumafen 0.005% Wax Blocks Asulam/Assex 40% Annual Report 2007 List of Approved Equipment and Supplies for the Pesticide Laboratory Fumehoods - Mechanical Water System - Mechanical Gas Systems - Mechanical Miscellaneous Equipment Annual Report 2007 Annual Report 2007 Annual Report 2007 Miscellaneous Consumables Annual Report 2007 Annual Report 2007 Pesticides Board Imported Chemicals (2007) - Trade Names 1. 2,4 D Amine 720g/l 42. Chlorine Granular 43. Chlorine Liquid 99% 44. Chlorine Powder Trichlor 45. Chlorine Tablets 46. Chlorox Anywhere 47. Chlorox Handiwipes 48. Chlorpyrifos 49. Chlorpyrifos 9. Alpha Cypermethrin 50. Cleaning Solution 10. Aluminium Phosphine 51. Clorox Bleach 52. Clorox Handiwipes 12. Angel Disinfectant 53. Clorox Liquid 13. Angel Fabric Softener 54. Control Flowables 14. Aqua Ammonia 55. Controlflowable 16. Asulam 80WDG 57. Crude Linseed Oil 58. Crustacel - G 20. Baygon Mosquito Coil 21. Baygon Spray 23. Better Value Bleach 24. Bio-guard Quaternary Ammonium 25. Black Disinfectant 69. Detia Fumex Bags/ Aluminuim 30. Brodifacoum Wax Block 71. Diafenthiuron 75. Disinfectant Floral 76. Disinfectant Lavender 77. Disinfectant Ocean Breeze 37. CHC Chlorine Granular 78. Disinfectant Wild Flower 39. Chemical latrine cleaner 41. Chlorine Gas Annual Report 2007 84. Dryel Refill Maki Mini Blocks 85. Dual Gold 96 Ec 88. Febreeze Fabric 90. Fenitrothion 500g/l EC Metamidophos 60SL 92. Fentin Acetate 60%WP Metsulfuron Methyl 93. Fish Aerosol Monocrotophos 60WSC 96. Fluazifop-P-Butyl 97. Fresh Scent 24x410ml 98. Fusilade 2000BD Oxiclean Active Stain Palmolive Dish Ultra 64oz Hydrocloric acid Hydroxide Solution Paraquat Dichloride 24%SL Imidiacloprid 70%WP Phostoxin Pellets Indufaom (Callaway) Piperonyl Butoxide PLC 400(Testrasol 2000) Insect Repellent Insectojet Fogging Bottles Pool Cleaning Tabs Protox Mosquito Coils Pynaying D'Allethrin Quaternary Ammonium Lambda Cyhalothrin Laundry Detergent Sodium Metabisulphite Sodium Triployphosphate Linseed Stand Oil Solvent Propylene Annual Report 2007 VAP-Dichlorvos Dimethyl Terbutryn 500 FW Annual Report 2007 List of Importers 1. Agri Quality Inc. 2. Associated Industries Limited 3. American Construction 4. Anderson Chemicals 5. Ansa McAl 6. Bacchus Drug Store 7. Bahadur Bhadwandass 8. Banks DIH Ltd. 9. Bryden & Fernandes 10. Caribbean Chemicals Guyana Limited 11. Demerara Distillers Limited 12. Didco Trading Company 13. FCT Technologies Guyana Inc. 14. Friendship Oxygen Company 15. Geddes Grant / Trading & Distribution Inc. 16. Globe Manufacturing 17. Guy A Plus Imports 18. Guyana Sugar Corporation 19. Guyana Water Authority 20. Hamlets Overseas Chem. 21. International Pharmaceutical Agency 22. MACORP 23. Mines Services Ltd 24. National Milling Company (NAMILCO) 25. Nobel House Seafood 26. Pestex 27. Rentokil Initial 28. Roma Manufacturing 29. The Outdoor Store 30. Torginol Paints Inc. 31. Una Adams Annual Report 2007 Total Imports of Pesticides by Common Names and Value 2007 Annual Report 2007 Annual Report 2007 Licensed Vending Premises East Coast Demerara 1 Abdool Zaleem Gaffar 9 Cotton Tree WCB Mahaica Market Stalls 26-27 ECD Lot 6 Beehive, ECD 4 Kharaj and Sons 43-44 Supply Mahaica, ECD 54 Virginia Village Canegrove ECD 6 Madray Rathanam Lot 8 Quakes Hall West Mahaicony, ECD 7 Michael Williams Lot 7 Clonbrook, ECD 8 Nalini Devi Prettipaul Lot D9 Wellington Bath Settlement, ECD 9 Parasram Seepersaud 1 Public Road Belmonte, Mahaica ECD 10 Ramdehol Bissoondat Lot B1 Bath Settlement, ECD 11 Ramdeo Basdeo Lot 8 Riverview Lancester Unity, ECD 12 Y.K. Sahib and Sons Lot 1 Section A Clonbrook ECD 1 Agri Quality Incorporated Lot 151 Thomas Street Kitty Georgetown R6 Ruimveldt Georgetown 104 Regent Road Bourda Georgetown 34 North Road and King Streets 4 Deonarine Ramgobin R6 Ruimveldt Georgetown 6 National Hardware Guyana LTD 17-19A Water Street Georgetown Lot 1-2 Industrial Site Ruimveldt 7 National Hardware Guyana LTD 9 America and Longden Street Georgetown 9 Caribbean Chemicals South Road Georgetown EBD, WCD, EBE and 1 Boodhoo's General Store 299 N1/2 parika Highway EBE Plot #7 Parika Backdam EBE Joy Marques (Marques' Animal 32 Crescenr Plaza Coop Crescent Linden Annual Report 2007 4 Lalldeo Bulkhan 118 Tuschen New Scheme EBE 5 Lalldeo Bulkhan 252-254 Parika Highway EBE 6 Lalldeo Bulkhan 214 Parika Old Road EBE 7 Lalta Digamber 8 Lalta Digamber 40 N-Sec Canal #2 WBD 18 Belle Street Poulderoyen 10 Rajesh Ganesh Lot 32 Parika Backdam EBE 12 Suresh Sanchara Lot 2 Soesdyke EBD Venkad Seeandan (Hope Feed 28-29 New Hope EBD 1 Abdool Jameel Uddin #57 Village Corentyne Berbice 2 Abdool Jameel Uddin Lot 3 Strand New Amsterdam Berbice 4 Cedric Premdas Lot 10 Grant 1802 CWC Berbice Chand Kumar Hardyal (Vishnu #71 Village Corentyne Berbice 6 Deomattie Sukhram Bengal Farm Corentyne Berbice 7 Geddes Grant Guyana LTD Lot 16 Strand New Amsterdam Berbice Dudnath's Hardware & Agri Lot 1 Sec.A #79 Corriverton Berbice Lot 5 Third Street Seawell Village Berbice 24 Grant 1651 Crabwood Creek Berbice Jason Beram Singh (Numark 19 Main and Pope Streets New Amsterdam 12 Khalil Nizamudeen 41 Rampoor Scheme Corriverton Bebice 13 Leekha Rambrich #41 Village Corentyne Berbice 14 Mohammed Kamalodeen Lot 5 Number 46 Village Corentyne Berbice 15 Nanlall Hardwar Lesbeholden BBP Berbice 16 Nazmoon Azimulla Lot 56 Johanna South BBP Berbice 17 Outram Ramprashad 49 Mibikuri BBP Berbice Poonai Bhigroog (Poonai's Lot 72A Rosehall Town Berbice 19 Ramesh Persaud #36 Village Berbice 20 Seunarine Hardeen 325 # 55 Village Corentyne Berbice 21 Sheik Sattaur #71 Village Corentyne Berbice 22 Sorojodin Jewdhan 91 Yakusari South BBP Berbice 23 Sukhram's Filling Station V. Annual Report 2007 7&8 Bush Lot Corentyne Berbice 25 Vishnu Sukhram Rosehall Town Berbice Region II Essequibo 1 Abdool Ansar Azam Lima New Housing Scheme Essequibo Adam Baksh (Imam Bacchus & Affaiance Essequibo Coast Lot 7 Henrietta Essequibo Alfro Alphonso (A&S General Stall 13 Charity Market Essequibo Coast New Road Essequibo Coast Ariff Mohammed Khan (Riff's 6 Lima Fish Complex) Lima Essequibo Coast 47 Cottonfield Essequibo Coast Land of Plenty Essequibo Coast 9 Basedeo Manman 40 Bush Lot Essequibo Coast 10 Boodhoo's General Store Anna Regina Essequibo 11 Caribbean Chemicals Lot C Anna Regina Essequibo Coast 6 Paradise Essequibo Coast 13 Ghamshan Dalchand Suddie Market Essequibo 14 Ghamshan Dalchand Anna Regina Market Essequibo 15 Ghamshan Dalchand 26 Adventure Essequibo 16 Ghamshan Dalchand Charity Market Essequibo 18 Cotton Field Essequibo Coast Lot 100 Charity Essequbo Coast Lot 1 Danielstown Essequibo Coast 22 Airy Hall Essequibo Anna Regina Essequibo 22 Karran Balbad 22 New Road Essequibo Coast 23 Monsoor Mohammed Charity Essequibo 24 Parmanan Persaud 78 Huist Dierrien Essequibo 25 T and R Bisnauth Lot A6 Spring Garden Essequibo Coast 26 Roopnarine Bisnauth Stall #5 Supenaam Market Essequibo Coast 27 Samaroo's Investment 201 Hampton Court Essequibo 47 Public Road Queenstown Essequibo 28 Sohanlall Baboolall Annual Report 2007 29 Sundar Persaud 6 Tayamouth Manor Essequibo 30 Tekram Sankar 28 Dennis Street Anna Regina 31 Thelome Matura 50 Aurora Essequibo Coast 32 Vincent Persaud West Bury Essequibo Coast 33 Yoolaim Bacchus 92b Makeshift Aurora Essequibo Coast Annual Report 2007 Pesticides and Toxic Chemicals Control Board Statement of Income and Expenditure for the Year Ended December 31st 2006 OPERATING INCOME 14,592,000 Subvention 558,441 Miscellaneous Income OPERATING EXPENDITURE 9,321,867 Employment Costs 0 Local Travel & Subsistence 456,000 Fees (Board Members) 179,330 Office Materials & Supplies 342,087 Building Maintenance 766,112 Print & Non-Print Materials 680,634 Fuel and Lubricants 309,374 Office Equipment Maintenance 361,442 Spares and Service 226,260 Telephone Charges 215,895 Refreshments 23,452 Bank Charges 3,092,189 Meetings & Other Events 1,488,667 Depreciation (2,312,868) Net Surplus/(Deficit) Annual Report 2007 Pesticides and Toxic Chemicals Control Board Accounts for Period Ending December 31, 2007 Fuel & Lubricants Spares & Servicing Office Material & Supplies Meetings & Other Events Telephone Charges Office Building Maintenance Office Equipment Maintenance Electricity Charges Administrative Fees NBIC (Management Account) NBIC (Current Account) Annual Report 2007 Pesticides and Toxic Chemicals Control Board Recurrent Revenue Subsidies and Contributions from Central Government Revenue from Operations Sale of Goods and Services Fees, Fines, etc. Rents, Royalties, etc. Other Recurrent Revenue Interest Received Miscellaneous Receipts Capital Grants from Central Sale of Assets, etc. Miscellaneous Capital Revenue Total Expenditure Recurrent Expenditure Wages and Salaries Overhead Expenditure Other Recurrent Charges Materials, Equipment and Fuel and Lubricants Rental and Maintenance of Maintenance of Infrastructure Transport, Travel and Postage Other Goods and Services Other Operating Expenses Education, Subventions and Annual Report 2007 Rates and Taxes and Subventions to Local Authorities Internal Interest External Interest Capital Expenditure Capital Expenditure Surplus (Deficit) External Loans (Net) External Loans – Disbursements External Loans – Principal Internal Loans (Net) Internal Loans – Disbursement Internal Loans – Principal Net Change in Cash and Bank Annual Report 2007 List of chemicals prohibited in Guyana (a) 2,4,5-T and its salt and esters; (e) Chlordimeform; (f) Chlorobenzilate; (i) 1-2-Dibromoethane; (j) Fluoroacetamide; (l) Hexachlorobenzene; (n) Mercuric chloride; (o) Methyl Parathion; (r) Pentachlorophenol; (s) Phosphamidon; (u) Mixed Isomers of Hexachlorocyclohexane; and Annual Report 2007 Organisational & Personnel Chart for the Pesticides and Toxic Chemicals Control Board Confidential Secretary Administrative Unit Administrative Officer Senior Laboratory Training & Awareness Junior Laboratory Annual Report 2007 Pesticides and Toxic Chemicals Control (Amendment) Act 2007 1. Short title. 2. Amendment of long title of Principal Act. 3. Amendment of section 7 of Principal Act. 4. Amendment of section 11 of Principal Act. 5. Amendment of section 12 of Principal Act. 6. Amendment of section 15 of Principal Act. 7. Amendment of section 16 of Principal Act. 8. Amendment of section 18 of Principal Act. 9. Amendment of section 19 of Principal Act. 10. Amendment of section 29 of Principal Act. 11. Amendment of section 32 of Principal Act. 12. Amendment of section 34 of Principal Act. Annual Report 2007 AN ACT to amend the Pesticides and Toxic Chemicals Control Act 2000. Enacted by the Parliament of Guyana:- 1. This Act, which amends the Pesticides and Toxic Chemicals Control Act 2000, may be cited as the Pesticides and Toxic Chemicals Control (Amendment) 2. The long title of the Principal Act is amended by inserting, immediately l of after the word "importation", a comma followed by the word "exportation". 3. Section 7 of the principal Act is amended- (a) by renumbering it "7 (1)"; by inserting in paragraph (b), immediately after the word "import", a comma followed by the word "export"; (c) by inserting in paragraph (f), immediately after the word "importation", a comma followed by the word "exportation"; by inserting, immediately after paragraph (i), the following paragraphs – to provide information and advice as required to fulfill Guyana's obligations under international agreements; to oversee Guyana's implementation of international agreements"; and by adding the following subsection – "In subsection (1)(ia) and (ib), "international agreements" means international agreements to which Guyana is a party concerning the manufacture, importation, exportation, transportation, storage, sale, use, or disposal of pesticides or toxic chemicals." 4. Section 11 of the Principal Act is amended by inserting, immediately after the word "import", a comma followed by the word "export". 5. Section 12 of the Principal Act and the marginal note are amended by Annual Report 2007 substituting for the words "or import" in both places where they occur, the words "import or export". 6. Section 15 of the Principal Act is amended by inserting, immediately after the word "import", a comma followed by the word "export". 7. Section 16(1) of the Principal Act is amended by inserting, immediately after the word "import", a comma followed by the word "export". 8. Section 18 of the Principal Act is amended - (a) by inserting in the marginal note, immediately after the word "imported", the words "or exported"; and (b) by inserting, immediately after subsection (2), the following "(3) Except as provided by the regulations, no controlled product shall be exported from Guyana unless the product wholly conforms to the law of Guyana and is accompanied by a certificate from Board in the form determined by the Board that the product does not contravene any known requirement of Guyana." 9. Section 19 of the Principal Act is amended - (a) by substituting, for subsection (1), the following subsection - "(1) The Minister may, by order made after consultation with the Board, specify either or both of the following for the purposes of this Act- (a) pesticides that must not be imported into or used in Guyana; (b) pesticides that must not be exported from Guyana"; (b) by substituting for the words "the list of specified prohibited pesticides" in subsection (2), the words "any order made under subsection (1)"; and Annual Report 2007 (c) by substituting for subsection (3) the following subsection - "(3) An order made under this section may provide for the withdrawal from sale or use, and for the disposal of, any pesticide specified in the order." 10. Section 29 of the Principal Act is amended - (a) by inserting in subsection (1), immediately after the words "imported into", the words "or to be exported from"; (b) by inserting in subsection (2), immediately after the word "importer", the words "or exporter (as the case may be)"; and (c) by substituting for subsection (3), the following subsections - "(3) In the case of a product to be imported into (a) if it appears from the report of the inspector or analyst that the sale or use of the product in Guyana would contravene this Act, the product must not be admitted into Guyana; (b) otherwise, the product shall, subject to any other law, be admitted into Guyana. (3A) In the case of a product to be exported from Guyana to another country, - (a) if it appears from the report of the inspector or analyst that exportation of the product to the country concerned is not authorized by an export license issued by the Board, the product shall not be exported from Guyana; and otherwise, the product shall, subject to any other law, be permitted to be exported to that country". Annual Report 2007 11. Section 32 of the Principal Act is amended – (a) by inserting in paragraph (a), immediately after the word "importation, a comma followed by the word "exportation"; (b) by inserting in paragraph (i), immediately after the word "imported", a comma followed by the word "exported"; and (c) by inserting in paragraph (w), immediately after the word "importers", a comma followed by the word "exporters". 12. Section 34(1) of the Principal Act is amended by inserting in paragraph (a), immediately after the word "imports", a comma followed by the word Passed by the National Assembly on 13th March, 2007. Clerk of the National Assembly. (BILL No. 4 /2007) Pesticides and Toxic Chemicals Regulations No. 5 of 2007
REGULATIONS
Annual Report 2007 MADE UNDER
THE PESTICIDES AND TOXIC CHEMICALS
CONTROL ACT 2000
(No. 13 of 2000)
ARRANGEMENT OF REGULATIONS
Insertion of new part VIA in Principal Regulations. IMPORTATION OF PESTICIDES OR TOXIC CHEMICALS
135A. Form of application for import licence. 135B. Features of import licence. 135C. Board to give reasons for refusing application. 135D. Board to give reasons for revoking licence. 135E. Notification of minor changes. Substitution of Third Schedule to Principal Regulations. New Third Schedule to Principal Regulations IN EXERCISE OF THE POWERS CONFERRED UPON ME BY SECTIONS 16 AND 32 OF THE PESTICIDES AND TOXIC CHEMICALS CONTROL ACT 2000, I HEREBY MAKE THE FOLLOWING REGULATIONS:-
Citation.
13. These Regulations, which amend the Pesticides and Toxic Chemicals Control Regulations 2004, may be cited as the Pesticides and Toxic Chemicals Control (Amendment) Regulations 2007. Annual Report 2007 14. (1) Subject to paragraph (2), these Regulations are deemed to have come into force on 27 November 2004. (2) Regulation 4 comes into force on 1 April 2007. Insertion of new Part 15. The Principal Regulations are amended by inserting, after Part VI, VIA in Principal Regulations. the following Part - IMPORTATION OF PESTICIDES OR TOXIC CHEMICALS 135A. Any person who wishes to import a controlled product may apply to the Registrar for an import licence in Form G of the Sixth Schedule accompanied by the fee set out in the Third Schedule. of 135B. An import licence issued by the Board (a) shall be in Form H of the importation of the product specified in the licence; (c) expires six months after its date of issue, unless an earlier expiry date is specified on the licence; and (d) cannot be transferred or 135C. If the Board decides to refuse an reasons for refusing application for an import licence, the Board shall, as soon as practicable, Annual Report 2007 notify the applicant in writing of this decision and the reasons for it. 135D. If the Board decides to revoke an reasons for revoking import licence, the Board shall, as soon as practicable, notify the licence holder in writing of this decision and the reasons for it. 135E. (1) The holder of an import licence shall notify the Registrar in writing of (a) any change in the trade name of a product specified in the (b) any change in the name or address of the holder; and (c) any change in the identity, name, or address of the supplier or buying agent. (2) A notification under paragraph (1) shall be made – importation of product under the relevant licence; and (b) in any case, within one month of the relevant change. (3) Failure to comply with paragraph (2) invalidates the licence." Substitution of
4. The Principal Regulations are amended by substituting, Third Schedule to
for the Third Schedule to those regulations, the Third Schedule Principal
set out in the schedule to these Regulations. Regulations.

Annual Report 2007 NEW THIRD SCHEDULE TO PRINCIPAL REGULATIONS
Regulation 4 "Third Schedule
Fee Structure for Pesticides and Toxic Chemicals Regulation 135A Application Fee for Import Licence A fee equivalent to 3% of the value (cost, insurance, and freight) of the pesticide or toxic chemical imported No other fee applies." Made this 13th day of March 2007. …………………………………………. Minister of Agriculture Annual Report 2007 New Form I added to Sixth Schedule of principal regulations APPLICATION FOR LICENCE TO EXPORT PESTICIDES AND TOXIC CHEMICALS (To be prepared in Duplicate) APPLICATION FOR EXPORT LICENCE PESTICIDES AND TOXIC CHEMICALS (Under the Pesticides and Toxic Chemicals Act (No. 13 of 2000)) TO THE REGISTRAR, PESTICIDES AND TOXIC CHEMICALS: We, _ of _ hereby apply for Licence to export the goods specified below to: Active Ingredients Registration No. (Country of consignment) Name and Address of Importer: _ e-mail: _ Phone No.: _ Fax No. _. We desire to forward these goods on or about _(Date) .(State whether by air or ship, or otherwise) Per _(Name of authorized Individual) Annual Report 2007 New Form J added to Sixth Schedule of principal regulations FORM OF EXPORT LICENCE PESTICIDES AND TOXIC CHEMICALS CONTROL BOARD PESTICIDES AND TOXIC CHEMICALS Permission is hereby granted under the Pesticides and Toxic Chemicals Control Act (No. 13 of 2000) to _ to export the following goods specified below: subject to the conditions, restrictions and limitations stated hereunder. This licence shall remain in force until the _ day of _ 20 _. Annual Report 2007 An enquiry committee appointed by the Honourable Minister of Agriculture comprising four members and one observer investigated a spray incidence which took place at Skeldon Estate on the 29th August 2007. The Committee visited the site and interviewed workers, union officials and representative, management personnel and aircraft technical personnel. The committee main findings and observation are summarised as follows: The workers were operating approximately 3.2 kilometres from the sprayed fields; Medical personnel did not observe any significant physical symptoms among the patients treated; Logistical arrangements for the spray application were adhered to but trafficking of the dams was breached since there was no alternative route predetermined; and Management response to the workers claim was not conciliatory. The committee main recommendations are summarised as follows: Educate workers and union officials of the chemicals used on the Estate; Wider dissemination of the intent to conduct aerial application of pesticides should be carried out; Field Management representatives should be in stationed at strategic points of the cultivation in radio contact with the airstrip to monitor progress and enforce access restriction; and Supervisory personnel including senior management staff should be more sensitive to claims of this nature. The Minister of Agriculture Honourable Robert Persaud appointed a Committee to enquire into the allegation of inhalation of pesticides at Skeldon Estate arising from an aerial application of herbicides on the 29th August 2007. The committee comprised of the following members: Dr. Kumarie Jaipersaud, Director of Regional Health Services, (Chairperson); Ms. Marlyn Samad, Guyana Agricultural Workers Union (GAWU)(Member); Dr. Harold Davis, Director of Agricultural Research (Member); Annual Report 2007 Mr. Basudeo Dwarka, Registrar, Pesticides and Toxic Chemicals (Member); and Mr. Fiazal Jafferally, Community Relation Officer (Observer). The Terms of Reference of the Committee were as follows: "enquire into the claims of the workers that they were affected by chemicals originating from the aerial application of herbicides on the 29th August 2007, at Skeldon Estate" This was communicated on the 31st August 2007.The venue for hearings was given as Skeldon Estate with the proposed date of commencement as the 7th September 2007 and submission of the report within fourteen days of the commencement. The Committee met on the 7th September 2007 in the Office of the Registrar, Pesticides and Toxic Chemicals Control Board 18 Brickdam, Stabroek, Georgetown. The meeting was convened to discuss the methodology and procedures for the investigation. The Committee visited Skeldon Estate on the 11th – 12th September 2007 and interviewed a cross section of workers, estate management and supervisory staff , Union officials and medical personnel from Guysuco and the Skeldon Hospital. The Committee then visited the Guyana Sugar Corporation Aircraft Department on Friday Sept 14th 2007and had discussion with the aircraft technical personnel. The operating principles of aerial spraying including the SATLOC M3 guidance system were explained. Guysuco recommended procedures for aerial application are outlined in APPENDIX I
COMMITTEE OBSERVATION AND FINDINGS

The names of the individuals interviewed are shown as Appendix II. The following are the finding of the Inquiry Committee after their investigation and interviews: Date of Application 29th August 2007 Time of Application – Start Annual Report 2007 Chemicals Applied & Rate Terbutryn 2.0 l / ha Location of Application SG/15 – 21 + 24 – 31 Gangs in the Alleged Drift Area 8 C Cane Harvesting No 5 Creole Gang (Fertilising) Number of Workers 8 C – 258 workers 5 A – 32 workers Number of workers complained 8 C – 67 persons 54 – 6 persons All of the complaints were of the scent of poison, no one made a differentiation as to what they were smelling; The complaints were from a complete cross section of the fields; All of the workers said they saw the aircraft; The effects complained of is consistent with the effects of 2,4-D Amine, burning of face, eyes and throat; The workers were operating approximately 3,200 metres from the location of the aerial The reports on wind direction and speed in the spray area were inconsistent and could not be verified with any accuracy The workers were treated by prophylaxis by the medical personnel but the three workers complaining of stomach pains were treated for ingestion and were retained for observations overnight; Medical personnel did not observe any significant physical symptoms among the persons treated. Complaints of stomach ailments were more consistent with ingestion of chemicals rather than inhalation or skin exposure; No leaks were detected from the aircraft at any time; The aircraft made two turns approximately 1000 metres away from the work area; Annual Report 2007 The aircraft would have been visible to the workforce at that distance. However according to the SATLOC image, the micronair nozzles were closed at the end of the run on the target areas; Complaints of chemical odour could have arisen from residual scents from the treated fields while traversing the Baker shop dam shortly after the spray operation; Managerial logistic arrangement for the spray operation was adhered to except with the trafficking of the only good dam which ran alongside the treated fields; there was no feasible planned alternative exit route; Management response in the post incidence period to the workers complaints and claims were not conciliatory; and (v) There is a widespread fear of any agrochemical among estate workers. HERBICIDE EVALUATION Active Ingredients Dichlorophenoxy Acetic Acid Synthetic auxin (acting like indolylacetic acid). Toxicity Classification Moderately Hazardous Mode of Action : Selective systemic herbicide where the salts are readily absorbed by the roots, whilst esters are readily absorbed by the foliage. Translocation occurs, with accumulation principally at the meristematic regions of shoots and roots. Also acts as a growth inhibitor. Annual Report 2007 Mammalian Toxicity Oral Acute oral LD50 for rats 639-764, mice 138 mg/kg. Skin and eye Acute percutaneous LD50 for rats >1600, rabbits >2400 mg/kg. Skin and eye irritant (rabbits). A skin sensitiser (guinea pigs). Inhalation LC50 (24 h) for rats >1.79 mg/l. Irritation of skin, eyes and respiratory tract. Inhalation may cause burning sensation in nasopharynx and chest, coughing, and/or dizziness. Headache, vomiting, diarrhea. Confusion, bizarre or aggressive behavior. Kidney failure, increased heart rate. Metabolic acidosis resulting in peculiar odor on breath. Active Ingredients Photosynthetic electron transport inhibitor at the photosystem II receptor site. Toxicity Classification Product unlikely to cause hazard in normal use Selective herbicide, absorbed by the roots and foliage, with translocation acropetally through the xylem, and accumulation in the apical meristems. Annual Report 2007 Mammalian Toxicity Oral Acute oral LD50 for rats 2500, mice 500 mg/kg. Skin and eye Acute percutaneous LD50 for rats >2000, rabbits >20 000 mg/kg. Not a skin or eye irritant (rabbits). Not a skin sensitiser (guinea pigs). Inhalation LC50 (4 h) for rats >2200 mg/m3 air. Acute systemic toxicity is unlikely unless large amounts have been ingested. Irritation of eyes, skin and respiratory tract Knowledge of the applications of pesticides on estates should not be interpreted as restricted to management. The corporation should be more forth coming as to notification of aerial spray operations. The Corporation should: Educate workers and the Union Officials of the chemicals used on the plantation and provide copies of Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) and a label of the chemicals where applicable; Provide a wider dissemination of the intent to conduct aerial pesticide application to all on the estate and the proposed dates, sites and restricted areas two days before the operations; Station field management representatives at appropriate strategic points of the cultivation with radio contact to the airstrip to monitor progress and to enforce precautionary rules with respect to restricted access to the area Annual Report 2007 during the conduct of any aerial pesticide application. This would remove any ambiguity with respect to resumption of traffic. The final decision whether to offer work or not to offer work on the day of the aerial application is the prerogative of the employer. The Union should: Work with the Corporation to inform its members of the types and nature of the herbicides used on the plantation, their relative properties and measures taken to ensure there is no risk of exposure; Workers should seek to make themselves more aware of the information on operation's on the estate and assure themselves that their programmed work will be in areas that will not expose them to chemical exposure. AERIAL APPLICATION SAFETY POLICY GUIDELINE The Guyana Sugar Corporation Agricultural Guidelines relative to the aerial application of pesticides should be reviewed with a view to revised the document and bring it in line with new policies where applicable. The content of the document should be disseminated to the Union and used for training and education of management, supervisory and workers. The critical technical considerations in handling of agrichemicals should be summarised in poster form and prominently displayed at various points in the estate. This document would form a good platform for workers Areas suggested for inclusion and review into the guidelines are as follows: Alternative entrance and exit through the plantation when aerial application is in progress and in an emergency; Annual Report 2007 Establishing buffer zones; Pre Application notification and procedures; and Post Application notification and procedures. Senior management should carry out unannounced audit check on the guidelines to verify adherence at any time on any day of aerial application. MANAGEMENT RESPONSE AND RESPONSIBILITY Supervisory personnel including senior management staff should be more sensitive to claims of this nature rather than to be openly dispute the allegations which are of a sensitive nature and could evolve into a potentially explosive situation . Pronouncements on these issues should be left to the medical personnel. EMERGENCY RESPONSE TIME Communication to the pilot can only be done from the central location at Ogle or at the airstrip at the point of refilling. The presence of staff members with radio contact at strategic points in the location would improve communication with the central location in the event of an emergency. The pilot would then be in a position to take the appropriate action to dump his load at the designated site should this action be MEDICAL RESPONSIVENESS It is desirable that each estate should have a medical officer on call or on permanent attachment to cope with emergency situations, including chemical incidents. There is Annual Report 2007 presently no guarantee that a doctor would be at the estate on each aerial spray campaign. However with improved knowledge of procedures and chemicals within the estate it is very likely the occurrence of alarming incidents such as the present situation could significantly decrease. 6. TRAINING OF SUPPORT STAFF Support staff to workers such as drivers should be included in all training initiatives as regards knowledge of pesticides so that they can understand risks associated with the various classes of pesticides and the importance of the transport staff input in an emergency response situation. The alternative routes to and from work location should be clearly communicated with their input on the day of any aerial application. The adherence to the guideline is the responsibility of the Field Manager who should have exercised more overall control of communication and emergency procedures. There is evidence of dispute of veracity of the claims of the workers in the post incidence period. Management should be trained to handle these situation is a more conciliatory manner. Superintendent Deane was weak and did not exercise any control over the lorry driver that drove through the spray area without warning. He should be given a written warning and counselling. The driver of the lorry who failed make "good sense prevail" knowing that the area was being sprayed and allowed the workers to influence his control of the vehicle should also be disciplined. He should be warned and counselled. Annual Report 2007 GUYSUCO GUIDELINES FOR AERIAL APPLICATION OF AGROCHEMICALS GENERAL These guidelines contain the information needed for the planning, preparation and execution of Aerial Application of Chemicals and Fertilizers to sugarcane. PLANNING AND PREPARATION Estates when deciding on work areas must take the following into consideration:- Safety of personnel, livestock and property in the vicinity of the area of Possible deleterious effects on water supplies and crops other than sugarcane or surrounding vegetation of the chemicals to be used. Possible annoyance and noise to people and livestock. Presence of flight obstructions such as masts, electric cables and trees. Having decided on the work areas estates are required to submit their maps and worksheets to the Agriculture Director, for approval a minimum of one week in advance of the date of the intended application. OPERATIONS Estates must ensure that their airstrips are properly maintained at all times and that this includes the display of a functional windsock. When fertilizers are being applied estates are to ensure that the fertilizer loader is at the airstrip with the required amount of fertilizer to complete the programme. In like manner adequate supplies of water and chemical must be available at the airstrip for spray operations. The Estate's Field Department is responsible to ensure on the day prior to the start of operations the boundaries of the individual blocks to be sprayed/ fertilised are clearly Annual Report 2007 delineated with flags. Flags are composed of flourescent orange or red material and are mounted at a height of at least 5 m. c Personnel are not permitted in the treatment Blocks during the aerial operations. A minimum boundary of 750 m (200 rods) is maintained outside of the operating area ,within which no person is permitted, is stipulated for all aerial operations Before commencing operation the pilot will conduct a reconnaissance of the areas to be spayed to ensure that the guide flags are clearly visible and correctly placed. Way-points for the Satloc operation are fixed during the actual spraying. Estate Field Department personnel must be aware that the aircraft swath width for: Solid Fertilizers is Liquid herbicide, ripener and growth regulators is 18.3 m ( Piston)# Liquid herbicide, ripener and growth regulator 27.4 m (Turbine) The productivity of the aircraft for operations is to be budgeted at Solid Fertilisers 40 has per hour flying time Herbicides, ripeners, growth regulators 115 has per hour flying time /hour flying time Insecticides are not under any circumstance applied by air to Guysuco's cultivation. All applications are flown in a straight line from one end to of a block of fields to the other end of the block parallel to the longest edge of the block. AIRCRAFT DEPARTMENT The Chief Pilot/Pilot will have in his possession a map and worksheet illustrating all obstruction data and potential dumping zones to enable him to do an initial site assessment. The pilot will review all possible problems with the Field Manager at the airstrip prior to the commencement of operations. It is essential that the Field Manager or his Senior A.F.M. and not a junior manager, conduct this review. Annual Report 2007 It is the responsibility of the Aircraft Department to ensure that the requisite oils, fuel, support equipment and personnel are in place at the location. The Aircraft Department ground staff will be on location one day before work is scheduled to commence to confirm the status of the airstrip and the state of readiness of the estate. PROTECTIVE CLOTHING AND FIRST AID All personnel involved in aerial applications must at all times during the operation wear the appropriate protective clothing. It is the responsibility of the Estate and the Aircraft Department to ensure that their respective personnel are in possession of the appropriate protective clothing. When chemicals (not including fertilizers) are being applied the flagmen must be provided with "Kleenguard" disposable overalls as well as the usual boots, gloves and hats. For fertilizer work the standard "Protecto" cotton/polyester overall is required together with boots, gloves and hats. The estate must display at the site of operation information about the types of chemicals, handling precautions quantity of chemical and total volume to be applied per acre and type of spray equipment to be used. If chemicals are changed during the course of an operation the aircraft hopper and spray equipment are flushed with copious quantities of clean water before the second set of chemicals are added. There must be supply of clean water for emergency decontamination at the airstrip. The water from the clean water container must not be used for mixing Annual Report 2007 A first-aid kit will be provided in the aircraft and in the ground support vehicles. The estate must arrange for a first-aid kit at the airstrip. As with all chemical use the Estate Medical Officer must be advised in advance of operations to ensure that any needed antidotes are to hand. This is especially important in the (unlikely) event that an insecticide is to be sprayed. EMERGENCIES AND MISHAPS It is the responsibility of the estate to have comprehensive standing instructions on action to be taken in the event of flag and crash emergencies, or mishaps with chemicals such as dumping and accidental spraying. Matters to be covered included: Procedures for emergency dumping at any time during the flight, preferably with a dump site identified. Crash/rescue procedures and provision of rescue, fire fighting and first- aid equipment at the estate airfield. Arrangements for emergency communications with Police, Fire and Ambulance Services. Methods of isolating and neutralising poisonous chemicals when dumped from the air, spilled during ground handling or in First-aid to be applied in the event of suspected poisoning. This information is available from the Agrochemical First Aid Poster, a copy of which must be on hand at the airstrip together with the needed first aid equipment. Annual Report 2007 Aircraft Department personnel at the airstrip will have ground to air communication with the aircraft. The flagmen's' supervisor who must be positioned in the field with the flagmen must have radio communication with the Field Manager's representative at the The Field Manager's representative at the airstrip must have communication with Estate Control Centre by radio. Aerial application on estate will be under the direction of the Field Manager or his representative. However, it must be made clear that in matters of aviation safety the Pilot has the overriding authority The estate must advise neighbouring householders or farmers of the planned operations wherever there is a possibility that the operations may impinge on them. Annual Report 2007 Gang / Representation Naimchand Lutchminarine 12263 K. Chunilall 14004 H. Ragunandan 18947 Y. Chattergoon 18837 Ramesh Singh 18857 D. Persaud 20340 D. Seenauth 18578 M. Hussien 15732 R.Ragubeer 18597 P. Melville 20510 N. Inderdas 20108 P. Persaud 11628 Purshotam Anand Persaud T. Bahadur Singh Jason Gravesande GAWU Organising Secretary Jerrick Southwell 17337 Representative 8 C Beatrice Basdeo; Estate Medical Officer K. Crawford 11024 Lennox April 19036 Representative 5 A Winston Noel 19154 District Medical Officer Ron Burnette 17525 Annual Report 2007 The participant wishes to acknowledge the contribution of the following: The People's Republic of China for making the course possible and the Government of Guyana and the Honourable Minister of Agriculture for selecting and allowing him to participate in the training programme; China International Centre for Agricultural Training (CICAT) for providing all the logistic arrangement for his participation in the course from Guyana and whilst in China; Mrs. Chen Hong, Office Chief and Ms Li Huiling, Program Officer of CICAT for their patience, support and encouragement during his stay in China and for also improving his understanding of Chinese customs, language and culture; The lecturers and other resource personnel of South China Agricultural University for their clarifications, explanation and understanding during the lectures, field work and experiments; The Staff of the Zhu Yuan Hotel for their accommodation, appreciation and patience; The staff of the Canteen for making meals satisfying and enjoyable; The students of SCAU for their patience and acceptance whilst making sightseeing in Guangzhou an entertaining experience; Team six (6) for their cooperation during the entire course; and Finally to all the participants of the course for making my stay in China an unforgettable one. Annual Report 2007 Introduction The China International Centre for Agricultural Training (CICAT) requires a final report as part of the "Crop Diseases and Pest Control Training Course 2007" from each participant that reflects the overall presentation and management of the course. This report will be used by CICAT, as a tool for evaluating the course as well as a correcting means for improving similar and other training courses. This report examines and considers the participant's involvement in the course with specific emphasis to the objectives of the training, training methods and techniques, activities, field visits, tours and other indirect activities of the course. Background Guyana has frequently been touted as the potential "bread basket" of the English-speaking Caribbean. This is mainly due to her vast land area - approximately 216,000 km2 – as compared with other Caribbean countries, suitable climatic conditions, and abundance of natural water resources, adequate topographic and pedographic characteristics, and the opportunity for the development of large-scale agricultural production systems. The single most important sector of Guyana's economy is agriculture, both in terms of foreign exchange generation and the number of persons employed. In any country where the economy is agriculturally driven, the agricultural sector must be critically managed to ensure that the sector is dynamic and is capable to respond to changing market demands that places more emphasis on food safety and other related issues. Against this background and the continuing rising cost of procured inputs such as pesticides and fertilisers, the Registrar of Pesticides and Toxic Chemicals was chosen by the Minister of Agriculture to represent Guyana at the "Training Course on Crop Disease and Pest Control for Developing Countries 2007". The expectation was to broaden and develop the selected individual capabilities in improved agriculture production techniques for additional job performance that involves technology transfer. The participant is expected after the completion of the training to impart new knowledge and skills leading to behavioural and attitude change by farmers so that they are better equipped to perform their roles that will – in the long term - be proactive to the demands of a dynamic market requirements. The training course was coordinated by the China International Centre for Agricultural Training (CICAT) and held at the South China Agricultural University (SCAU), Annual Report 2007 Guangzhou, People's Republic of China from October 10th 2007 to 25th November 2007. The course attracted sixty-eight participants from thirty-nine countries. Objectives The major objective of the training course was to expose the participants to agricultural progress, pest management strategies and control techniques used for the management of crop pests and diseases in China; Secondly, provide the trainees with the necessary tools to improve and promote agricultural development in their home country; Thirdly, exposure to agricultural pest and disease management strategies and control techniques used in other participating countries; Fourthly, exposure to some new management and control techniques currently being researched and under evaluation in China specifically at South China Agricultural University; and Fifthly, exposure to the culture and lifestyle of the people of China. Accommodation The participants were accommodated at the Zhu Yuan Hotel located on the South China University Campus, 483 Wushan Street, Tianhe, Guangzhou. Activities (1) Training Methods and Techniques The teaching techniques employed for the training of the participants were theoretical lectures and presentations, group discussions, symposiums, laboratory work and field practice as well as educational and recreational tours. The participants were exposed to training that encompassed the following subject area: Rice insect and diseases and their ecological control; Vegetable insect and diseases and their ecological control; Pathogenic nematodes and their identification and control; Pathogenic viruses and their detection and control; Pathogenic bacteria, their detection and control; Fruit insects and their ecological control; (vii) Weed Science; (viii) Ecology and control of locusts; (ix) Chemical and Botanical pesticides; Pesticide residue analysis and inspection; Experiments on chemical pesticides and rapid inspection techniques; (xii) Microbial and bio pesticides and production techniques; Annual Report 2007 (xiii) Application of biotechnology to diagnosis and control of plant diseases; and (xiv) Insect enemies and application to pest control. The participants had field visit to the following areas during the course: (i) Xinhui – Cultivation base of organically grown rice; Xinhui – Milling and Packaging facility for Organic rice; Yangchun – Orchards for lichi, citrus and banana; Shenzhen – Modern Agriculture Demonstration Farm; Shenzhen – Huanong Biological Engineering Company Limited; Shenzhen – Noposion Chemical Company; (vii) Zhuhai - Zhuhai Agricultural Research Institute; (viii) Zhuhai - Panyu Agricultural Research Institute; (ix) Guangzhou - Guangdong Entomological Institute; and Guangzhou - Guangdong Plant Quarantine Centre. The participants had educational and recreational tour of the following areas and events: (a) 102nd Canton Fair, Guangzhou Honda Car Assembling Plant, City tour of Guangzhou; Splendid China – Shenzhen; Jing Hua Yuan Park; South China Agricultural University Campus; and Lecture and presentation on Chinese culture and lifestyle, history, beliefs, visit to Chinese family, participating in Chinese sports activities such as badminton, table tennis Ping Pong, tug of war, football, volley ball and other activities such as: Theatrical Performance of "Journey to the West"; Other plays; and Personal Interaction with Chinese students and other persons. Areas of Interest Annual Report 2007 NOTE: The participant area of work is in the management of pesticides and toxic chemicals and whilst he is aware of most of the agricultural research development in Guyana in the last three years, he is not totally aware of unsuccessful research areas relative to Guyana agriculture before this time. The possibility exists that some areas proposed may have already been researched and the participant is not aware of it, or, the findings of these investigations. Against the aforementioned background this section of the report is written and is based only on the participant's awareness, knowledge and experience. The lectures and presentations were mainly based on the ecological control methods or Integrated Pest Management techniques successfully utilised in China. Presentations were also made of new and developing research techniques in South China Agricultural University. Arising out of these lectures and presentations from the participating countries, the participant believes that Guyana's agriculture stands to benefit by thoroughly investigating and researching the following technological areas, and where applicable, introduction into our agriculture production systems. The proposed areas are as follows: Diadegma semiclusum – can be used to control diamond back moth in cabbage. The presentation showed that there could be approximately 80% control of this pest using biological control with this agent; Trichogramma confusum – can be used to control some pests in Guyana. Research work need to be carried out to determine the pests applicable to Guyana and whether the insect can survive under local condition. China has the technique to produce the eggs required to rear the pest in the laboratory. This could also be used against the diamond back moth in cabbage. Padi bugs – control of the rice bug in Thailand and other countries have been successful using the fungus Metarhizium anisopiae excellent effects. Further work needs to be carried out to determine if the strain of the fungus used is different from the one experimented in Guyana. Need to make Integrated Pest Management, Integrated Crop Management and Good Agricultural Practices a part of all research and control of pest. This guiding principle should be should be set by the Minister of Agriculture and incorporated in all research in Guyana for agricultural purposes. Field scale experimentation should be carried out using yellow light to determine control of some pest in vegetables especially in areas where the houses are located on the farms and where possible solar energy cost effectiveness can be determined for application. Control of Ecchornia crassipes (water hyacinth) by some varieties of fungus and insects could be helpful in the control of the water flow in the irrigation system. The weevil Neochetina eichhorniae (Warren), N. bruchi (Hustoche) and the moth Sameodes albugitalis (Warren) have been successfully used to restrain the spread of the weed in Sudan. The moth was introduced into that country Annual Report 2007 and the climate and conditions are similar to Guyana's. The report from that country stated that "N. brushi inflict reduction in leaf numbers and offset production, N. eichhorniae reduced the doubling time for the weed and offset production and no weeds have been reported south of that country." This will be of great importance in Guyana especially in the irrigation canal and rivers that are sometimes blocked and pose a hazard to flooding. Some fungus was also determined as natural enemies, namely: Acremonium zonatum; Alternaria eichhorniae; Cercospora piaropi; and Helminthosporium bicolour. Some beneficial insects are available on a commercial scale from Austrailia www.bugsforbugs.com.au . Possibility exists for initial investigation of biocontrol agents for some pests in Guyana in the laboratory to determine control against some similar pests as presented. Relook at technologies and their effect and applicability or acceptability in Guyana; Use of Gas and Liquid Chromatographs and its importance in pesticide analysis. This understanding was important since Guyana is now establishing a pesticide laboratory. Rapid Detection techniques for organophosphates and carbamates will need to determine same and applicability in Guyana especially for exported fruit and vegetables. Understanding the development and synthesis of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt); need to look at the strains of Bt and possible resistance, 6 strains produced in China cyt1, p21zb, etc. this will prove to be vital in the evaluation of registration documents for bio pesticides.
Comments & Suggestions

(a)
General Training Course Training is a complex activity and in any training and learning environments, trainee motivation is essential for receptivity and learning which was well executed by the coordinating committee. The Course was well planned and organised with all the lecturers punctual and timely in their delivery and presentations. The organiser provided clear daily instructions and timely message updates to the participants related to the training schedule and other activities. Suggestions: There are no suggestions since the organisers were able to provide all the requirements required for the training course. Annual Report 2007 Lectures and Presentation All of the lectures were informative and well presented and the lecturers were timely in their delivery. However, some lecturers were experiencing some difficulties in understanding questions from the participants which could have been two fold – most of the participants delivery of English were not of the best and the lecturers had difficulty in understanding or the lecturers had difficulty in expressing themselves in English. It is also accepted that there will be always be some difficulty for any lecturer delivering a two hour lecture in another language once per year and then spending the rest of the year lecturing in Chinese. Within the aforesaid it may be portrayed that the comment is unfair, however, it must be taken as "unfair but necessary." In light of the above arguments, no suggestion can be made. Laboratory Sessions Comments: The laboratory sessions were well organised and applicable to the training, however, in my opinion due to the splitting of the participants into two groups, the laboratory session were too short since the time had to be split in two as well. This allocation of time did not allow the participants to interact well and being able to totally achieve the objectives and purpose of the laboratory sessions. Some of the laboratory session requires a least two to three weeks to arrive at a result, so the participants were unable to determine the importance of the laboratory preparation eg biocontrol of citrus red mites and weed science. The laboratory sessions should be allocated that each group will have a different laboratory sessions at the same time and interchange the following day. This will allow the participants to maximise their understanding of the sessions. The courses that require long term determination should be done in the first week and there should be a second laboratory session to see the result and interpret what it means to agriculture practices. Comments: These were well organised and essential to the lectures Annual Report 2007 Educational & Recreational Tours Comments: These were well organised and essential to the lectures, while the recreational tours were well received and offered a good understanding of china and its development as well as tourist offerings. Chinese Culture: An excellent exposure to Chinese culture and the participant was better able to appreciate the way of life of the Chinese people. There was lacking of presentation of simple day-to-day Chinese language. The training course manual presented a couple of sentences but the pronunciation is not the same and the participants should have an understanding of this. It must be accepted that one of the unique part of Chinese culture is the language I would suggest that there should some exposure to the intricacies of the language so that participants will understand better Chinese culture since the language is part of the culture. Others – Accommodation and Meals Accommodation and meals were excellent. However, there was not enough local cuisine available. What must be accepted is that you can't be in China and eating another country's cuisine. Participants should be exposed to more local cuisine. This I feel would aid in understanding Chinese culture as well.

Future Plans
The areas considered important by the participant will be presented to the various
departments of the Ministry of Agriculture for their action and possible inclusion in
their work programs. Follow up will be done in the short (2 years), medium (5 years)
and long term (10 years) to make a determination on the achievement derived from this
training. Where possible, the participant will try to work along with some department
to achieve a pronouncement on the important areas identified.
Conclusion
Annual Report 2007 In conclusion, the course has achieved all of its stated objectives, while the participant exposure to the management techniques in crop management in China and the other participating countries will play a key role for Guyana in the face of increasing demands for adequate and safe food in an ever expanding market especially in the context of sustainable agriculture and plant protection. Also, the promotion of Integrated Pest Management (IPM) and Good Agricultural Practice (GAP) along with the use of new and improved technologies will be an important component in increased and sustainable agricultural production in Guyana. This will also maintain environment safety and provide economic feasibility as well as deriving greater efficiency from procured inputs such as pesticides and fertilisers. -------------------- Annual Report 2007 St. Lucia Report Report Title:
Sound Management of Chemicals in the Caribbean
Bay Gardens Hotel, St. Lucia, October 29-31, 2007

Participants in attendance were from a number of Countries Regional Institution as well as National Institutions (see Appendix). Objectives of the Training Course
a) To achieve consensus on priorities pertaining to the stockpile of Persistent Toxic b) To promote information sharing and exchange of best practice in chemicals management c) To provide framework for development of a regional strategy for the safe disposal of Persistent Toxic Chemicals d) To contribute towards a draft regional policy on chemical stockpiling, and on the management and transboundary movement of PTS and other hazardous wastes
Technical Sessions
were presented on the Regional, Legal and Institutional Framework for the
Management of Obsolete Pesticides Stockpiles, The Prevention and Disposal of Obsolete Pesticides and The Roles and Requirements of The Rotterdam & Stockholm Conventions. Arising from the various technical and working group sessions was the development of National
and Regional Priorities for the Sound Management of Chemicals in the Caribbean. These are as
National Priorities
1. Inventory of Obsolete Stockpiles 2. Inventory of sites contaminated by PTS 3. Harmonization of Legislation and Agencies 4. Preventing Mercury Contamination 5. Public Awareness 6. Creation of National Implementation Plans Annual Report 2007 Regional Priorities
1. Inventories of PTS & PCB'S 2. Registration and licensing procedures 3. Capacity Building 4. Information Exchange 5. Identifying proper Storage & Disposal facilities 6. Implementation of NIP's
Importance and Applicability to Guyana
1. Inventory of Obsolete Stockpile and Pesticide Contaminated Sites
- FAO has indicated there interest and assistance in executing an Inventory for Obsolete Pesticide Stockpiles in Guyana, which can be facilitated by the FAO TCP Facility in 2. Development and Implementation of Methods for Preventing Mercury Contamination
- The Use of Mercury in mining was highlighted because of the Environmental Contamination risk related with its use. 3. Identification and Development of a Proper Storage Facility
- A Proper Storage facility is needed for seized pesticides. 4. Development & Implementation of NIP's
- In accordance with the Stockholm Convention, to which Guyana has not yet acceded to, countries must develop and endeavour to implement a plan for the implementation of its obligations under the Convention. Financing for eligible countries to develop these plans is available through the Global Environment Facility. Annual Report 2007

Source: http://ptccb.org.gy/newsandreports/reports/ANNUAL%20REPORT%202007%20.pdf

The fair labor standards act exemptions and the pharmaceuticals industry: are sales representatives entitled to overtime?

The Fair Labor Standards Act Exemptions and the Pharmaceuticals Industry: Are Sales Representatives Entitled to Overtime?Steven I. Locke Follow this and additional works at: Part of the nd the Recommended CitationSteven I. Locke (2009) "The Fair Labor Standards Act Exemptions and the Pharmaceuticals Industry: Are Sales RepresentativesEntitled to Overtime?," Barry Law Review: Vol. 13: Iss. 1, Article 1.Available at:

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