Medical Care |

Medical Care

##SEVER##

/b/bhpbilliton-aws.net1.html

Les antibiotiques sont produits sous des formes pharmaceutiques telles que des pilules antibiotiques en ligne.

elles permettent d'injecter la quantité de préparation strictement nécessaire.

Petroleum csg

Health, Safety, Environment and Community
Petroleum
Management System
Heat Stress Management
PETROLEUM CSG
HSEC MANAGEMENT SYSTEM PROCEDURE
HEAT STRESS MANAGEMENT
Petroleum HSEC Procedure No: PHSE-13-P10
Date: May 9, 2012
Revision: 0.1
Owner: Kim Phillips, Occupational Health and Hygiene Manager
Approver: Kristen Ray, Vice President HSEC
Signature On File PHSE-13-P10 CONTROLLED DOCUMENT Rev. 0.1
Printed copies of this document are not controlled. To verify this copy is current, check the Petroleum Portal. Health, Safety, Environment and Community
Petroleum
Management System
Heat Stress Management
TABLE OF CONTENTS
CONTROLLED DOCUMENT
Printed copies of this document are not controlled. To verify this copy is current, check the Petroleum Portal. Health, Safety, Environment and Community
Petroleum
Management System
Heat Stress Management
1.0 PURPOSE

This procedure is designed to reduce the risk of heat-related disorders by reducing the potential for an increase of internal body temperature of 1ºC (approximately 2ºF) and to assist in the assessment of the heat stress conditions for BHP Billiton Petroleum personnel.
2.0 SCOPE

This procedure applies to the entire lifecycle of Petroleum activities, processes and products, including exploration and planning, development, operations, closure, marketing and acquisitions and divestments. Partners, suppliers and contractors are encouraged to adopt this procedure. Where there is a conflict between legislation and Petroleum requirements, the more stringent standard prevails while ensuring legal compliance requirements are met. This procedure applies to all BHP Billiton Petroleum Personnel. Contractors not working under direct BHP Billiton Petroleum supervision must have an equivalent system that meets the intent of this procedure. The intent is to manage heat stress factors affecting personnel who work outside of climate controlled environments.
3.0 REFERENCES

CONTROLLED DOCUMENT
Printed copies of this document are not controlled. To verify this copy is current, check the Petroleum Portal. Health, Safety, Environment and Community
Petroleum
Management System
Heat Stress Management
4.0 DEFINITIONS

Acclimated – A gradual physiological adaptation that improves an individual's ability to
tolerate heat stress. Acclimatization usually takes several days with a gradual build-up
to expected heat loads, workloads and duration on the job
Dry Blub Temperature – The temperature of air measured by a thermometer freely
exposed to the air but shielded from radiation and moisture.
Heat Stress – The net heat load on the body from the ambient environment, clothing,
PPE requirements and metabolic demands of work.
Heat Illness – A heat-induced illness that can cause serious injury.
Heat Stroke – A failure of the body's perspiration mechanism resulting in accelerating
rise in body core temperature.
Hydration – The process of adsorbing and retaining water in the human body.
Personnel – Employees and contractors working under the direct supervision of BHP
Billiton Petroleum.
Radiant Heat – Heat transmitted directly by infrared radiation from a heat source, and
not by conduction or convection
Relative Humidity – A measure of the amount of water vapor in air.
Responsible Line Manager or Supervisor - The direct supervisor/manager of the work
activity. This will normally be the supervisor/manager of personnel or the contract
sponsor.
Senior Line Manager - Production Unit Manager, Worldwide Drilling Manager, Project
Director, Exploration Manager.
Shall or Must – Means a mandatory requirement.
Thermal Work Limit – A heat stress index designed primarily for self-paced workers. It
represents the limiting sustainable metabolic rate that a well hydrated, acclimatized
worker can maintain in a specific thermal environment within safe limits of core body
temperature and sweat rate.
Wet Bulb Temperature – The lowest thermometer temperature that can be reached by
the evaporation of water only.
Wind Speed – Average wind speed as measured by an anemometer.
Work Zone – The levels of control necessary to counter the factors that contribute to
heat stress.
CONTROLLED DOCUMENT
Printed copies of this document are not controlled. To verify this copy is current, check the Petroleum Portal. Health, Safety, Environment and Community
Petroleum
Management System
Heat Stress Management
5.0 PROCEDURE
5.1 Introduction
Heat stress arises from a combination of work activities, environmental factors, health and factors outside of work (e.g. adequate rest, stress, medication, alcohol consumption). The management of heat stress is a shared responsibility between line management and each individual. Management of heat stress requires the following measures to be undertaken: • Assessing environmental and work conditions. • Development of production unit or division specific controls. • Provision of adequate cooling, hydration, and engineering controls. • Training of personnel about the causes, controls and symptoms of heat illness.
5.2 Thermal Work Limit

Thermal Work Limits (TWL) are calculated levels of heat that can be dissipated by a workers body into the environment. Thermal risks must be assessed as Unrestricted, Controlled, or Restricted work zones. • Unrestricted Work Zone – Conditions are adequate to mitigate the risks for acclimated workers. New workers or those who have been off work due to illness follow the next highest work zone. • Controlled Work Zone – Additional controls are required to manage heat risks. Restricted Work Zone – Conditions require enforced controls where work being performed. The thermal work limit assumes personnel are fit for duty, adequately rested and hydrated and able to self pace their work. CONTROLLED DOCUMENT
Printed copies of this document are not controlled. To verify this copy is current, check the Petroleum Portal. Health, Safety, Environment and Community
Petroleum
Management System
Heat Stress Management
5.2.1 Environmental Factors

The environmental factors that must be considered when assessing TWL are: • Dry Bulb Temperature, • Wet Bulb Temperature, • Globe Temperature, All units of measure are converted to Centigrade (°C) for temperature and Meters per second (M/s) for wind speed when using the Thermal Work Limit.
5.2.2 Operational Factors

The risk of heat illness can be significantly reduced by effective planning and resourcing. Each Responsible Line Manager must ensure that schedules, work cycles or job roles are assessed for heat illness risks. The following items must be assessed at a minimum: • Will work be carried out with limited shade cover? • Will work be carried out in a confined space? • Is local ventilation and/or refrigerated air conditioning available for cooling? • Will specialized protective clothing beyond normal PPE be required while • Are workers allowed to self pace their work? When planning/ scheduling work, supervisors must consider; • the TWL work zone for the hottest period of the work shift; • adjusted start and finish times to avoid the hottest part of the work shift; • provision of adequate rest breaks; • where possible scheduling heavy, physical work for the early or cooler times of • conducting toolbox meetings, training programs, and meetings in shaded or air- conditioned areas; • rotating personnel to give additional breaks during the hottest period of the day. CONTROLLED DOCUMENT
Printed copies of this document are not controlled. To verify this copy is current, check the Petroleum Portal. Health, Safety, Environment and Community
Petroleum
Management System
Heat Stress Management
5.2.3 Medical Factors

The ability of the body to effectively manage heat stress can be affected by medical conditions or medications taken by personnel. Common medical conditions that can raise body temperature or cause fluid loss can add to the effects of heat on the body. These can include: • Fever (Bacterial, Viral, Immune Response) • Food Poisoning • High Blood Pressure • High Body Mass Index Medications that can make heat stress effects more potent include: • Anti-Inflammatory Analgesics (Prescription strength Ibuprofen, Acetaminophen) • Tranquillizers (Lorazepam, Xanax, Halcion) • Blood Pressure Medication (Altace, Accupril) • Muscle Relaxants (Soma, Flexeril, Valium) • Diuretics (Lasix, Dyazide, Aldactone) • Stimulant (Caffeine, Ritalin, Zyban) Personnel taking these or similar medications, or those who are currently or recently have been unwell should follow the next highest level of work zone and discuss with appropriate medical personnel.
5.2.4 Personal Factors

Personal behavior can affect heat stress as well. Positive behaviors include: • Maintaining good hydration on and off shift. • Limiting consumption of alcohol and caffeine in off hours. • Eating healthy meals. • Obtaining adequate sleep levels. • Good cardiovascular health. CONTROLLED DOCUMENT
Printed copies of this document are not controlled. To verify this copy is current, check the Petroleum Portal. Health, Safety, Environment and Community
Petroleum
Management System
Heat Stress Management
5.3 Risk Controls

Production Unit or Division specific controls for mitigating heat stress must be applied using the hierarchy of controls. Controls listed in the Work Zone Controls, Attachment must be adopted as the minimum standard where Production Unit or Division specific controls have not been developed. The number of employees at risk and the level of risk must be considered when implementing controls.
5.3.1 Acclimatization
Personnel must work in hot environments for a period of seven days to allow the body necessary internal adjustments before being considered acclimated. Non-acclimated personnel working in temperatures exceeding 27 °C (80 °F) will follow the next highest controls for the current work zone. For example, if the work zone is ranked "Unrestricted" an unacclimated person would follow the "Controlled" work zone controls. Personnel away from the work environment for a period longer than fourteen days, such as vacation or illness, must be reacclimated for an additional seven days. Infrequent visitors and contactors must also be treated as though they are unacclimated.
5.3.2 Rest

Provision of adequate rest is required as per the Petroleum Fatigue Management procedure.
5.3.3 Cooling

Designated areas providing refrigerated (A/C) cooling must be made available for rest and recovery where facility or vehicular air-conditioning is not readily available. Specialized personal protective equipment which aids in cooling may be considered but must meet the requirements of the Petroleum Personal Protective Equipment procedure. Additional non-refrigerated local ventilation can aid cooling in temperatures up to 43 °C (110 °F). Air movement at temperatures above this level can make heat stress worse. CONTROLLED DOCUMENT
Printed copies of this document are not controlled. To verify this copy is current, check the Petroleum Portal. Health, Safety, Environment and Community
Petroleum
Management System
Heat Stress Management
5.3.4 Work/Rest Cycles

Personnel must be rested and fit for duty at the commencement of work on site. Opportunities for rest during the work-shift must be provided in accordance with the TWL work zone controls. At a minimum, one break must be provided between each 4 hours of work with one break of sufficient length to have a meal (i.e. 30 minutes). More frequent short breaks must be allowed during high risk activities.
5.3.5 Fluid Replacement

At high temperatures, the body can lose more than one liter (32 oz) of water per hour through sweating. Prior to start of each shift there must be made available cool potable water for drinking. The amount required to be available depends on the work zone controls in effect. Water is the best fluid to maintain proper body hydration. Eating at normal intervals is sufficient for maintaining electrolyte levels. Intake of sports drinks (Sqwincher®, Gatorade®) is allowed as a supplement to water in moderation. Care must be taken that no more two sports drink (32 oz) per person is consumed per shift. Low sugar (<15g per serving) varieties are preferred. Coffee, soda and other caffeinated beverages are discouraged as caffeine contributes to dehydration. Alcoholic beverages and energy drinks (Monster, Rockstar, 5-Hour Energy, etc.) are not allowed on sites and must not be consumed a minimum of 8 hours prior to the commencement of work on site.
6.0 Assessing the Thermal Work Limit
Environmental condition can be reviewed at any time but must be assessed when local conditions reach 29.5°C (85°F) and 30% humidity. The Thermal Work Limit may be assessed in several ways. Responsible HSEC Managers must ensure that one of the following methods is followed: CONTROLLED DOCUMENT
Printed copies of this document are not controlled. To verify this copy is current, check the Petroleum Portal. Health, Safety, Environment and Community
Petroleum
Management System
Heat Stress Management
6.1 Manual Method

• Obtain seven day forward weather forecasts that provide highest daily temperature (dry bulb temperature), relative humidity, and expected wind speed. Obtain the Wet Bulb Temperature or use the online calculator to convert temperature and relative humidity to the wet bulb temperature. Use 760 millimeters of mercury (mmHG) for actual station pressure. • Review the attached TWL charts and select one that closest matches worksite • Cross reference the Temperature and Wet Bulb Temperature on the selected chart and note the Work Zone indicated. • Communicate the 7 day TWL work zones to affected personnel. • Ensure specified work zone controls are in place and properly resourced. • Regularly update the forecasts to take account of the maximum possible warning period for inclement weather conditions.
6.2 Direct Read Method

• Deploy a heat stress monitor (HSM) capable of displaying TWL information (Calor® HSM, Kestrel 4400®) in a work location determined to be representative of other like work locations. Obtain the thermal work limit reading from the HSM to determine the appropriate work zone. • Communicate the TWL work zone information to affected personnel. • Ensure specified work zone controls are in place and properly resourced. • Regularly update the forecasts to take account of the maximum possible warning period for inclement weather conditions.
6.3 Direct Read Method 2

• Use direct read instruments that can provide dry bulb temperature, wet bulb temperature, globe temperature and wind speed. Units must be converted to Centigrade and meters per second. • Enter the dry bulb temperature, wet bulb temperature, globe temperature and wind speed into the online calculator • Obtain the TWL work zone indicated by the calculator. • Communicate the TWL work zone information to affected personnel. • Ensure specified work zone controls are in place and properly resourced. • Regularly update the forecasts to take account of the maximum possible warning period for inclement weather conditions. CONTROLLED DOCUMENT
Printed copies of this document are not controlled. To verify this copy is current, check the Petroleum Portal. Health, Safety, Environment and Community
Petroleum
Management System
Heat Stress Management
7.0 Training
7.1 Awareness

Induction
Awareness level training must be provided to all personnel. The purpose of this training is to provide information and education related to the risk factors and signs of heat stress. As a minimum, the training topics must enable the individual to understand the following: • Responsibilities and how to recognize the effects of heat stress in themselves • The influences of a healthy lifestyle and non-work activities on heat stress • The effects of medical conditions, rest, and drugs and alcohol. • The effect of personal protective equipment on heat stress factors. • The controls in place for each work zone to managing heat stress factors. • The responsibility to use off hours effectively and present fit for work and hydrated when the work shift begins. Awareness level training must be presented to all employees every two years to ensure a minimum level of understanding. Short periodic refresher sessions are recommended for climates that experience seasonal hot temperatures.
7.2 Supervisory Roles

Induction
Supervisory level training must be provided every two years and within one year of the commencement of a supervisory role. The purpose of the training is to provide the skills and information to implement heat stress management principles in the daily operation of their assigned duties. This training will also assist supervisors to recognize and manage heat stress risks with their direct reports. Training topics must include those contained in the awareness level training and the following: • The controls in place for each work zone to managing heat stress factors. • Understand responsibilities and when to initiate heat stress controls. • How to appropriately manage employees who present signs of heat illness. CONTROLLED DOCUMENT
Printed copies of this document are not controlled. To verify this copy is current, check the Petroleum Portal. Health, Safety, Environment and Community
Petroleum
Management System
Heat Stress Management
8.0 RESPONSIBILITIES
8.1 All Personnel

• Present fit for work at the commencement of and during the work period. • If not fit for work then notify their supervisor to ensure that an appropriate risk mitigation process is implemented. • Comply with the heat stress management controls. • Monitor for the signs and symptoms of heat illness in co-workers and team • Communicate and report heat stress issues to their Supervisor or site
8.2 Responsible Line Managers or Supervisors
• Ensure that persons under their control are aware of and comply with the controls in this procedure. • Communicate the appropriate work zone controls to personnel and ensure they • Ensure that applicable work schedules comply with this procedure. • Monitor personnel for the signs and symptoms of heat illness. • Implement additional controls as needed for managing heat stress. • Conduct a review of any heat illness related incidents and the effectiveness of existing control measures as required.
8.3 HSEC Managers and Supervisors
• Provide timely advice, support and assistance to Responsible Line Manager or Supervisors in the implementation of this procedure. • Ensure the Thermal Work Limit is being identified and communicated to all • Liaise with the HSEC Function to develop Production Unit or Division specific controls as needed. • Ensure that heat stress related incidents are reported and heat stress is considered during incident investigation.
8.4 Senior Line Managers

• Review and approve Production Unit or Division specific heat stress controls as • Approve the variance procedure process as necessary. CONTROLLED DOCUMENT
Printed copies of this document are not controlled. To verify this copy is current, check the Petroleum Portal. Health, Safety, Environment and Community
Petroleum
Management System
Heat Stress Management
9.0 VARIANCES

Any planned deviations from the requirements of this procedure shall be recorded on and submitted t Variances to this procedure must be approved by: 1. Senior Line Manager 2. HSEC Occupational Health and Hygiene Manager
10.0 UPDATES TO THIS DOCUMENT

This is a Petroleum HSEC Controlled Document. Requests for updates to Petroleum HSEC Controlled Documents shall be documented on tand sent to temail in the GAL.
11.0 ATTACHMENTS

11.2 Work Zone Controls 11.3 Thermal Work Limit Charts CONTROLLED DOCUMENT
Printed copies of this document are not controlled. To verify this copy is current, check the Petroleum Portal. Health, Safety, Environment and Community
Petroleum
Management System
Heat Stress Management
11.1 Flowchart

Review Environmental Heat Stress Management Factors and assess the Thermal Work Review identified risks and assess controls beginning with the minimum required list.
zone controls to zone controls.
controls address effectiveness of adequately controlling CONTROLLED DOCUMENT
Printed copies of this document are not controlled. To verify this copy is current, check the Petroleum Portal. Health, Safety, Environment and Community
Petroleum
Management System
Heat Stress Management
11.2 Work Zone Controls

Work Zones
Controls
No limits on self-paced work
Personnel are educated, hydrated, and acclimated. One break per four hours of work with one at least 30 minutes Conditions may be limiting to work
Specific site induction for all noncore crew and visitors required emphasizing hydration and identifying signs of heat stress. Any practicable intervention to reduce heat stress should be implemented e.g. provide shade, improve ventilation etc. Controlled
Working alone to be avoided where possible. Unacclimatized workers must take additional breaks. Fluid intake of ≥ 0.5 liter (1 bottle) per hour required. Work limited to essential maintenance and operations
Provision of refrigerated cooling (A/C) must be made available. Working alone only with authorization from the site manager. Personnel must take a 10 minute break each hour in a shaded Restricted
Specific site induction required emphasizing hydration and identifying signs of heat stress. Fluid intake of ≥1 liter (2 bottles) per hour required. CONTROLLED DOCUMENT
Printed copies of this document are not controlled. To verify this copy is current, check the Petroleum Portal. Health, Safety, Environment and Community
Petroleum
Management System
Heat Stress Management
11.3 Thermal Work Limit Charts

CONTROLLED DOCUMENT
Printed copies of this document are not controlled. To verify this copy is current, check the Petroleum Portal. Health, Safety, Environment and Community
Petroleum
Management System
Heat Stress Management
CONTROLLED DOCUMENT
Printed copies of this document are not controlled. To verify this copy is current, check the Petroleum Portal. Health, Safety, Environment and Community
Petroleum
Management System
Heat Stress Management
CONTROLLED DOCUMENT
Printed copies of this document are not controlled. To verify this copy is current, check the Petroleum Portal. Health, Safety, Environment and Community
Petroleum
Management System
Heat Stress Management
CONTROLLED DOCUMENT
Printed copies of this document are not controlled. To verify this copy is current, check the Petroleum Portal.

Source: http://www.bhpbilliton-aws.net/~/media/bhp/documents/suppliers/hsec-information/petroleum/heat-stress-management.pdf?la=en

ihtresearch.com

NITROCUT SUBJECTS' INFORMED CONSENT TITLE: Evaluation of the Safety and Efficacy of a Dietary Supplement ("Nitrocut" ) Designed to Improve Strength and Lean Body Mass IRB PROTOCOL # _ SPONSOR: Nitrocut LLC, 4780 Ashford Dunwoody Road, A336, Atlanta. GA. 30338 INVESTIGATORS: Gilbert R. Kaats, PhDa; Harry G. Preuss, MDb; Larry K. Parker, Sr, MDc

mppolice.gov.in

dk;kZy; lsukuh] gkWdQkslZeq[;ky; Hkksiky Øekad@lsukuh@gkWd@D;w0,e0@423 @14] fnukad 20 @08@14 iqfyl egkfuns'kd e-iz- }kjk fuEukafdr lkexzh ds fy, fuekZrk @iznk;drkZvksa ls eksgjcan fufonk vkekaf=r dh tkrh gS%& dsEkks¶ykbZtMkaxjh Vh&'kVZ ¼jkm.M usd o dkWyj½ 1&lkexzh dh ek=k vko';drkuqlkj deh@o f) dh tk ldrh gSA 2&fufonk fuEukuqlkj jgsxh ¼v½ rduhdh fufonk ¼c½ foRrh; fufonkA 3&izR;sd vkbZVe dh rduhdh ,o afoRrh; fufonk,a vyx&vyx eksgjcan fyQkQs esa jgsxhA 4&fufonk